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WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 



3 0399 0819214 6 



WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY 

THE Z. SMITH REYNOLDS LIBRARY 




CALL NO. 




1976 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/minutesofanniver1976thre 



Bicentennial 
Commerative Edition 



Annual Of 



THREE FORKS 
RAPTIST ASSOCIATION 




136th ANNUAL SESSION 



Held With 
PERKINSVILLE BAPTIST CHURCH 
August 3, 1976 

BRUSHY FORK BAPTIST CHURCH 
August 4, 1976 





Let Christ's Freedom Ding 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
OF NORTH CAROLINA 



136th ANNUAL SESSION 



Held With 
PERKINSVILLE BAPTIST CHURCH 
August 3, 1976 

BRUSHY FORK BAPTIST CHURCH 
August 4, 1976 



1977 ANNUAL SESSION 



The Next Annual Session Will Be Held On Tuesday And Wednesday 
Following The First Sunday In August 1977. 



First Day 
Preacher: 



Blowing Rock, First 
J. C. Jones, Jr. 
Herbert McCoy 



Second Day 
Preacher: 



HowEird's Creek 



Dr. R. Paul CaudiU 



Alternate. 



Alternate: 



J. R. Bouldin 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Associational Directory 3 

Place and Preacher 3 

Order of Business 3 

Committee on Committee Report 3 

Director of Library Service 3 

Committees to report to 1977 Session 4 

Organist or Pianist 4 

Church Training Organization 5 

Woman's Missionary Union Organization 5 

Messengers to Association 5 

Ordained Ministers, not Pastors 6 

Licensed Ministers 6 

Ministers Licensed this year 7 

Ministers Ordained this year 7 

Church Secretaries 7 

Historical Events 7 

Minister of Education 8 

Minister of Recreation 8 

Church Missions Committee Chairman 8 

Stewardship Chairman 8 

Ministers of Youth 8 

Executive Committee 8 

Program 9 

Constitution 11 

Proceedings 14 



REPORTS 

Annuity Board 27 

Associational Properties 18 

Baptist Children's Home 24 

Baptist Foundation 26 

Baptist Men 18 

Biblical Recorder 23 

Camp Joy 18 

Christian Education 23 

Church Library 27 

Church Training 25 

Cooperative Program 25 

Evangelism 22 

Executive Committee 21 

Foreign Missions 27 

Home Missions 23 

Homes for the Aging 18 

In Memoriam 28 

Interin-Missionary's Report 21 

Missions Committee 20 

Music Ministry 25 

Nominating Committee Report 26 

North Carolina Baptist Hospital 23 

Pastoral Support 21 

Public Morals 20 

Resolutions 26 

State Missions 24 

Statistical Report 22 

Sunday School 26 

Treasurer's Annual Report 29 

Vacation Bible School 1976 22 

Woman's Missionary Union 19 

History of Three Forks Baptist Association 33 

Historical Table 36 

Minutes of the Three Forks Baptist Association September 1865 39 

Tables 42 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



CHURCHES 

Antioch ' 61 

Beaver Dam 62 

Beech Valley 63 

Bethel 64 

Bethany 66 

Blowing Rock 67 

First Baptist Church of Boone 68 

Brushy Fork 69 

Clarks Creek 70 

Cool Springs 71 

Cove Creek 72 

Elk Knob 73 

Forest Grove 74 

Friendship 75 

Gap Creek 76 

Green Valley 77 

Greenway 78 

Howard's Creek 79 

Laurel Springs 80 

Mabel 8 

Meat Camp 82 

Middle Fork 83 

Mount Calvary 84 

Mount Lebanon 86 

Mountain Dale 87 

Oak Grove 88 

Perkinsvilie 89 

Plesant Grove 90 

Poplar Grove 91 

Profitt's Grove 92 

Rich Mountain 93 

Rutherwood 94 

Shulls Mills 95 

South Fork 96 

Stony Fork 98 

Tabernacle 99 

Three Forks 100 

Timbered Ridge 101 

Union 102 

White Rock 103 

Vanderpool 104 

Willowdale 105 

Willow Valley 106 

Zion Hill 107 

Zionville 108 



MINOR'S PRINTING/BOONE, NORTH CAROLINA 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

ASSOCIATIONAL DIRECTORY 

Moderator Dr. R. L. Newton 

Tel. 295-7934, Box 371, Blowing Rock 28605 

Vice Moderator Charles Allard 

Tel. 264-5895, Rt. 2, Box 7, Boone 28607 

Clerk Mrs. Blanche Perry 

Tel. 297-2567, Rt. 1, Box 18, Vilas 28692 

Treasurer Jerry Adams 

Tel. 297-2403, Box 126, Sugar Grove 28679 

Sunday School Director James W. Churchwell 

Tel. 264-1573, Rt. 3, Box 21 A, Boone 28607 

Church Training Director Mrs. Nora M. Wilson 

Tel. 297-2028, Rt. 1, Box 207, Zionville 28698 

Brotherhood Director John D. Cook 

Tel. 264-2384, 107 Hillcrest Drive, Boone 28607 

W M U Director Mrs. Norman L. Reese 

Tel. 297-2248, Rt. 2, Box 53 A, Vilas 28692 

Music Director Dr. Charles Isley 

Tel. 264-9294, 115 Woodland Drive, Boone 28607 

Director of Library Services Mrs. Custer Wallace 

Tel. 264-8210, 729 East Howard St., Boone 28607 

Director of Camp Joy Mrs. Margaret Hartley 

Tel. 297-2807, P. O. Box 385, Boone 28607 

Ass't Director Camp Joy Mrs. Alma Earp 

Tel. 264-7252, Bristol Road, Boone 28607 

Historian Clyde R. Greene 

Tel. 264-3096, Rt. 2, Boone 28607 

Pianist Miss Kathy Cottrell 

Tel. 264-2824, 101 Watauga Drive, Boone 28607 

Supt. of Missions Earl Pym 

Tel. 264-4482, Rt, 2, Box 47, Boone 28607 

ORDER OF BUSINESS PLACE AND PREACHER 

Robert L. Newton Moderator First Day: First Baptist, Blowing Rock 

Mrs. Blanche Perry Clerk Preacher: J. C. Jones, Jr. 

Earl Pym Supt. of Missions Alternate: Herbert McCoy 

Robert L. Newton Host Pastor, Blowing Rock, First 

James Ray Tester Host Pastor, Howard's Creek Second Day: Howard's Creek 

Preacher: Dr. R. Paul Caudill 
Alternate: J. R. Bouldin 

DIRECTORS OF LIBRARY SERVICES 

Beech Valley Miss Cloyce Harmon, Rt. 1, Elk Park 28622 

Boone, First Mrs. Richard Baker, 306 Poplar Hill Dr., Boone 28607 

Cove Creek Mrs. Blanche Perry, Rt. 1, Box 18, Vilas 28692 

Greenway Miss Jean Smitherman, 104 Straight Street, Boone 28607 

Howard's Creek Mrs. Cornelia Miller, Rt. 5, Boone 28607 

Mabel Ms. Peggy Burkett, Zionville 28698 

Middle Fork Miss Teresa Triplett, Rt. 4, Rogers Drive, Boone 28607 

Poplar Grove Ms. Sandy Hampton, Boone 28607 

Three Forks Miss Dinia Wheeler, 2002 East King Street, Boone 28607 

COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES REPORT 

FINANCE COMMITTEE PROPERTIES COMMITTEE: MISSIONS COMMITTEE 

1977 Jerry Adams - Cove Creek 1977 Lewis Burkett - Mabel 1977 Robert Mann - Boone, First 

1977 Howell Hayes - Three Forks 1978 Perry Greene, Jr. - Boone, First 1977 Johnny Walser - Middle Fork 

1978 Dean Baughn - Mt. Calvary 1979 Grady Stilwell - Blowing Rock, First 1978 Howard Parlier - Rutherwood 

1978 George Miles - Boone, First 1978 Jack Lawrence - Greenway 

1979 Hiram Brooks - Brushy Fork 1979 Paul Caudill - Bethel 

1979 Pete Tester - Howard's Creek 1979 Mrs. John Robinson - Greenway 



3 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



NOMINATING COMMITTEE: 
1977 Vern Lee Greene - South Fork 

1977 John Ward - Oak Grove 

1978 Earl Greene - Meat Camp 

1978 Bill Hartley - Perkinsville 

1979 Mrs. Alfred Adams - Boone, First 
1979 Mrs. Luther Oliver, Jr. - Mabel 



TRUSTEES: 

1977 Guy Norris - Howard's Creek 

1978 Ray Lawrence - Boone, First 

1979 Mrs. John Ward - Oak Grove 



COMMITTEES TO REPORT TO 1977 SESSION: 



Associational Missions Supt. of Missions 

Annuity Board Mrs. J. O. Young, Boone, First 

Baptist Foundation Wade Brown, Boone, First 

Baptist Hospital Edsel Cook, Rutherwood 

Children's Homes Herman Eggers, Boone, First 

Christian Education Danny Cook, Greenway 

Christian Literature Mrs. Lucille Wallace, Greenway 

Christian Stewardship Bob Moore, Cove Creek 

Cooperative Program Ray Minton, Willow Valley 

Foreign Missions Charles Allard, Perkinsville 

Home Missions CO. Vance, Greenway 

State Missions James Lambert, Boone, First 

Homes for the Aging Fred Greene, Willow Valley 

Memorials Mrs. Blanche Perry, Cove Creek 

Pastoral Support Raymond Harmon, Willow Valley 

Public Morals Ralph Beshears, Oak Grove 



ORGANIST OR PIANIST 



Beaver Dam Mrs. Blanche Wilson, Rt. 2, Vilas 28692 

Beech Valley Mrs. Roetta Harmon, Rt. 2, Butler, Tenn. 37640 

Bethel Ms. Norma Farthing, Rt. 2, Vilas 28692 

Blowing Rock, First Miss Beth Palmer, 1118 Wood Circle, Boone 28607 

Boone, First Dr. Max Smith, Rt. 3, Box 335, Boone 28607 

Brushy Fork Mrs. Phyllis Foster, Rt. 1, Vilas 28692 

Clark's Creek Ms. Lois Hodges, Rt. 1, Sugar Grove 28679 

Cool Springs Ms. Joanna Sherrill, Boone 28607 

Cove Creek Mrs. Joyce Ragan, Rt. 2, Boone 28607 

Gap Creek Ms. Jan Church, Deep Gap 28618 

Greenway Mrs. Carole Robinson, Rt. 3, Box 665, Boone 28607 

Howard's Creek Ms. Carolyn Coffey, Rt. 5, Boone 28607 

Laurel Springs Mrs. Carolyn Cheek, Rt. 1, Boone 28607 

Mabel Mrs. Margaret Oliver, Zionville 28698 

Meat Camp Ms. Sandra Clawson, Rt. 2, Boone 28607 

Mount Calvary Ms. Janice Lecka, Banner Elk 28604 

Middle Fork Mrs. Jan Hayes, Homespun Hills, Boone 28607 

Oak Grove Mrs. Clinton Parker, Rt. 5, Box 517, Boone 28607 

Perkinsville Miss Kathy Cottrell, Farthing St., Boone 28607 

Pleasant Grove Mrs. Ruby Perry, Rt. 1, Zionville 28698 

Poplar Grove Ms. Ann Welch, Rt. 3, Boone 28607 

Proffit's Grove Mrs. Peggy Welch, Rt. 3, Boone 28607 

Rich Mountain Mrs. Mayselle Hagaman, Rt. 1, Box 163, Zionville 28698 

Rutherwood Miss Mitzi Hodges, Rt. 1, Boone 28607 

Shulls Mills Miss Carol Clark, Rt. 3, Boone 28607 

South Fork Miss Kathy Greene, Rt. 2, Boone 28607 

Stony Fork Ms. Wanda Beshears, Rt. 1, Deep Gap 28618 

Tabernacle Mrs. Johnny Moretz, Rt. 1, Boone 28607 

Three Forks Mrs. Rose Bolick, Rt. 1, Boone 28607 

Willowdale Miss Connie Mast, Vilas 28692 

Willow Valley Mrs. Gladys Denny, Sugar Grove 28679 

Zion Hill Ms. Willamae Combs, Rt. 1, Sugar Grove 28679 

Zionville Mrs. Barbara Wilson, Mountain City, Tenn. 37683 



4 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



CHURCH TRAINING ORGANIZATION 

Director Mrs. Nora M. Wilson 

Tel. 297-2028 Rt. 1, Box 207, Zionville 28698 

Pastor-Advisor Rev. J. C. Jones, Jr. 

Tel. 264-8241 or 264-7750 Rt. 4, Greenway Road, Boone 28607 

Associate Director Rev. Eugene Byrd 

264-4626 New River Heights, Boone 28607 

Director New Member Training George A. L. Cook 

Tel. 297-3995 Rt. 1, Box 321 A, Vilas 28692 

Director Leader Training Mrs. Nora Greene 

Tel. 264-8503 Rt. 2, Box 229 Boone 28607 

Adult Director . \ Mrs. Ruby Michael 

Tel. 264-2169 Delmar Street, Boone 28607 

Youth Director Mrs. Belle Greene 

Tel. 264-8453 Rt. 1, Blowing Rock 28605 

Assistant Youth Director Donald G. Critcher 

Tel. 264-8332 103 Poplar Hill Drive, Boone 28607 

Children's Director Mrs. Blanche Roberts 

Tel. 264-8201 or 264-3773 400 East King St., Boone 28607 

Preschool Director Miss Ann Sherwood 

Tel. 297-2445 P. O. Box 94, Sugar Grove 28679 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION ORGANIZATION 

Director Mrs. Norman L. Reese 

Tel. 297-2248 Rt. 2, Box 53 A, Vilas 28692 

Assistant Director Mrs. Alfred Adams 

Tel. 264-3749 P. O. Box 632, Boone 28607 

Baptist Women Director Mrs. Blanche Roberts 

Tel. 264-8201 400 East King St., Boone 28607 

Baptist Young Women Director Mrs. John Ward 

Tel. 297-2732 Rt. 5, Boone 28607 

Acteen Directors Mrs. Paul Shepherd 

Tel. 297-2015 Rt. 1, Vilas 28692 

Mrs. Bobby Hodges 

Tel. 264-4541 303 Farthing St., Boone 28607 

Girls in Action Director Mrs. Bob Cook 

Tel. 264-9267 Rt. 2, Boone 28607 

Mission Friends Director Mrs. Archie Carroll 

Tel. 264-2705 Rt. 1, Box 116, Boone 28607 

Mission Action Director Mrs. Henry Greer 

Tel. 264-8063 307 Crest Drive, Boone 28607 

Secretary-Treasurer Mrs. Tom Turbyfill 

Tel. 297-2261 Rt. 1, Sugar Grove 28679 

MESSENGERS TO THE ASSOCIATION 

BEAVER DAM — Clyde Robinson, Clay Robinson, Dean Reese, Raymond Eller, Dennis Creed. 
BEECH VALLEY — Miss Cloyce Harmon, Ms. Viola Ward, George Harmon, Henry Oakes. 

BETHEL — Mrs. Loy Farthing, Mrs. Lena Farthing, Mrs. Helen Farthing, Mrs. Evelyn Farthing, Mrs. Mary Sherwood. 
BLOWING ROCK, FIRST — Mr. and Mrs. Grady Stilwell, Dr. & Mrs. C. O. Hodges, Dr. and Mrs. Robert L. Newton. 
BOONE, FIRST — Jim Churchwell, Edwin Dougherty, George Miles, Mrs. Daisy Adams, Mrs. Viola Young, Adrian Little- 

john, James Lambert, Mr. & Mrs. Ralph Means, Robert Mann. 
BRUSHY FORK — Mr. and Mrs. A. Y. Howell, Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Edmisten, Mr. and Mrs. John DeWinkler, Mrs. Mary 

Moody, Mrs. Alma Phillips, Mrs. Pauline Roten. 
CLARK'S CREEK — Mr. and Mrs. Robert Greene, Mr. and Mrs. John Smith, Mrs. Margie Welch. 
COOL SPRINGS — Milton Payne, Mrs. Vergie Rogers, Mrs. Pearl Cook. 
COVE CREEK — Mr. and Mrs. Bob Moore, Dean Swift, Don Perry, Mrs. J. R. Bouldin. 
GAP CREEK — Mrs. Blanche Stewart, Eddie Stewart, Mr. and Mrs. Roe Church, Mrs. Ruth Phillips. 

GREENWAY — John D. Cook, Scott Wheeler, Mrs. Juanita Bottoms, Mrs. Bertha Robinson, Joe Shuford, Art Williams, 

Mrs. Carole Robinson 
HOWARD'S CREEK — Walt Tester, Glenn Townsend, Wayne Tester 



5 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



LAUREL SPRINGS — Mrs. Geraldine Miller, Kerry Krider, Mrs. Mayzelle Parlier, Miss Marion Ford, Mr. and Mrs. Worth 

Clawson, Mr. and Mrs. Dwight Stanbery. 
MABEL — Mrs. Madge Reece, Mrs. Bina Townsend, Mrs. Mollie Burkett, Mrs. Charlotte Walls, Mrs. Phyllis Norris. 
MEAT CAMP — Mrs. Nora A. Greene, Mrs. Emily Clawson, Mrs. Eva Simmons, Mrs. Blanche Foster. 
MIDDLE FORK — Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Greene, Rev. and Mrs. George Berry, Johnny Walser, Mrs. Viola Rogers. 
MOUNT CALVARY — Mr. and Mrs. Lee Greer, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Bentley, Clarence Howell, Mrs. Bonita Smith. 
OAK GROVE — Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Moretz, Mrs. Edna Vines, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Beshears, Eugene Byrd, Vance Culler, 

J. W. Norris, Mrs. Jean Reece, Mrs. Kathleen Ward. 
PERKINSVILLE — Mrs. Lelia Brown, Randy Pawley, Tim Tomason, Mrs. Palmer, Charles AUard, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph 

Hartley, Mrs. Lottie Greene. 
PLEASANT GROVE — Mr. and Mrs. Don H. Perry, Emory Mitchell, Mrs. Blanche Greer, Tom Perry, Roy Greer. 
POPLAR GROVE — Mace Fletcher, Mrs. Doris Dotson, Earl Blackburn 
PROFFIT'S GROVE — Jake Winebarger, Clemmie Elizabeth Main, Mrs. Lucille Miller. 
RICH MOUNTAIN — Carter Moretz, Ms. Pauline Moretz. 

RUTHERWOOD — Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Brown, Sr., Mr. and Mrs. Boyden Atwood, Mrs. Jewel Hardin. 
SHULLS MILLS - Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Harbin. 

SOUTH FORK — J. B. Miller, Mrs. Annie Blackburn, Mrs. Mary Risk, Rev. and Mrs. R. D. Byrd, Mrs. Elsie Jones. 
STONY FORK — W. L. Greene, Harold Carlton, Mrs. Mary V. Beshears, Mrs. Hannah Smith, Mrs. Edna Welborn, Mrs. Nina 
Greene. 

TABERNACLE — Glenn Stanbery, Ms. Vonny Stanbery, Fred Brown. 

THREE FORKS — Mr. and Mrs. Howard Brookshire, Mr. and Mrs. James Austin, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Edmisten, Mr. and 

Mrs. Ernest Hartley. 
TIMBERED RIDGE — Grady Smitherman, Fred McGuire, Spencer May. 
WHITE ROCK — Hoyle Shook, Tom Shook, Mrs. Ruth Shook, Mrs. Ada Shook. 

WILLOWDALE — Mrs. Maxie Edmisten, Mrs. Doris Greer, Mrs. June Issacs, Miss Corrine Greer, Mrs. Nell Matheson. 
WILLOW VALLEY — Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Wheeling, Mrs. Gladys Denny, Fred Greene, Mr. and Mrs. George Harmon, 

Ms. Mattie Rominger. 
ZION HILL — Ray Harmon, Ms. Marie Harmon. 

ZIONVILLE — Ms. Lucille Miller, Mrs. Mary Vannoy, Max Miller, Ms. Emogene Miller, Ms. Janet M. Reece. 



ORDAINED MINISTERS NOT PASTORS 



Carl Wilson, Rt. 2, Vilas 28692 Beaver Dam 

Dr. James Stines, Box 862, Blowing Rock 28605 Blowing Rock, First 

Dr. Harry Padgett Ed, Rt. 3, Box 725CC, Boone 28607 Boone, First 

Dr. O. D. Holton Ed, 412 Poplar Hill Drive, Boone 28607 Boone, First 

Dr. Larry Keeter Ed, 303 Tracy Circle, Boone 28607 Boone, First 

Dr. Wiley Smith R, 919 Faculty St., Boone 28607 Boone, First 

James Lambert SW, Rt. 5, Box 150B, Boone 28607 Boone, First 

Dr. Fred Badders Ed, Rt. 5, Box 151A, Boone 28607 Boone, First 

Dr. W. C. Strickland Ed, Rt. 1, Blowing Rock 28605 Boone, First 

David Austin, Rt. 1, Blowing Rock 28605 Cool Springs 

C. O. Vance R AW, Rt. 1, Box 189, Banner Elk 28604 Greenway 

Roy D. Keller R, Rt. 4, Box 157, Boone 28607 Greenway 

Roby Painter R, Rt. 3, Box 520, Banner Elk 28604 Mount Calvary 

Eugene Byrd, Rt. 5, Box 324, Boone 28607 Oak Grove 

Arlie Moretz, Rt. 3, Box 69A, Boone 28607 Oak Grove 

Boyd Lunsford, Rt. 5, Boone 28607 Rich Mountain 

Howard Cook R, Rt. 8, Box 482D, Morganton 28655 Rutherwood 

Raytee Greene EP, Rt. 1, Wilkesboro 28659 Stony Fork 

Bynum Trivette, Rt. 1, Deep Gap 28618 Stony Fork 

Raymond Hendrix, Rt. 1, 101 Delmar Street, Boone 28607 Three Forks 

John Ward, Rt. 2, Vilas 28692 Timbered Ridge 

William H. Smith, Rt. 1, Box 286, Banner Elk 28604 White Rock 

R. C. Eggers, Rt. 1, Zionville 28698 Zionville 

LICENSED MINISTERS 

Jack Bryan, Rt. 2, Boone 28607 Proffit's Grove 

Steve McKinney, Rt. 3, Boone 28607 Proffit's Grove 

Frank Pope, Zionville 28698 Proffit's Grove 

Ricky L. Norris, Rt. 1, Box 196, Boone 28607 South Fork 

Burl Jones, Rt. 2, Vilas 28692 Willow Valley 



6 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



MINISTERS LICENSED THIS YEAR 



Richard Baird, 413 Lakewood Drive, Hendersonville 28739 Brushy Fork 

Robert M. Moore, Sr., Southeastern Seminary, Wake Forest 27587 Cove Creek 

Roe Church, Deep Gap 28618 Gap Creek 

Roy Mark King, 11 Buena Vista Apts., Boone 28607 Greenway 

Johnny Wilson, Rt. 1, Zionville 28698 Pleasant Grove 

Carter Moretz, Rt. 5, Boone 28607 Rich Mountain 



MINISTERS ORDAINED THIS YEAR 

Donald Critcher, 103 Poplar Hill Drive, Boone 28607 Poplar Grove 

Delmar James, Rt. 1, Sugar Grove 28679 Willowdale 



CHURCH SECRETARIES 



Beaver Dam Ms. Phyllis Creed, Rt. 2, Vilas 28692 

Beech Valley Miss Inez Harmon, Rt. 1, Elk Park 28622 

Bethel Carson Cornett, Rt. 1, Sugar Grove 28679 

Blowing Rock, First , Mrs. Larry Marley, Rt. 4, Parkway Forest Estates, Boone 28607 

Boone, First Ms. Judi Shumate, Rt. 3, Box 115A, Boone 28607 

Clark's Creek Ms. Mary E. Greene, Rt. 1, Banner Elk 28604 

Cool Springs Ms. Betty Andrews, Rt. 1, Blowing Rock 28605 

Gap Creek Ms. Linda Fairchild, Deep Gap 28618 

Greenway Mrs. Carole Robinson, Rt. 3, Box 665, Boone 28607 

Laurel Springs Mrs. Juanita Norris, Rt. 1, Boone 28607 

Mabel Ms. Amy Walls, Zionville 28698 

Meat Camp Ms. Sandra Clawson, Rt. 2, Boone 28607 

Middle Fork Mrs. Shirley Triplett, Rt. 4, Rogers Drive, Boone 28607 

Mount Calvary Ms. Janette Townsend, Banner Elk 28604 

Oak Grove Mrs. John Ward, Rt. 5, Box 47, Boone 28607 

Perkinsville Mrs. Donna Vannoy, Rt. 2, Boone 28607 

Pleasant Grove Miss Glenda Wheeler, Rt. 1, Zionville 28698 

Poplar Grove Ms. Opal Hampton, Boone 28607 

Proffit's Grove Miss Penny Cole, Rt. 3, Boone 28607 

Rutherwood Mrs. Edsel Cook, Rt. 1, Boone 28607 

South Fork Mrs. Joan Jones, Todd 28684 

Stony Fork Mrs. Betty Norris, Rt. 1, Box 122, Deep Gap 28618 

Tabernacle Ms. Judy Hampton, Blowing Rock Road, Boone 28607 

Timbered Ridge Ms. Mary Helen Ward, Rt. 2, Vilas 28692 

White Rock Donald Smith, P. O. Box 194 Linville 28646 

Willowdale Mrs. Lucy Lawrence, Rt. 1, Vilas 28692 

Willow Valley Miss Debbie Minton, Rt. 1, Vilas 28692 

Zion Hill Ms. Barbara Harmon, Rt. 1, Sugar Grove 28679 

Zionville Miss Kathy Lewis, Rt. 1, Box 75, Zionville 28698 



HISTORICAL EVENTS 

BLOWING ROCK, FIRST — Special Bicentennial Christian Citizen Service; Youth Corps worker half-time; new Allen 
organ dedicated; August Radio ministry — Sunday School and worship. 

BOONE, FIRST — Lay Witness Mission, November 14-16, 1975; adopted new Church Constitution and By-Laws; held 
first "Sharing Christ through Creative Arts and Crafts" Festival, February 1976; first B S U — Church Mid-Winter Retreat, 
January 1976. 

COVE CREEK — Licensed Robert M. Moore, Sr.; Observed 176th Anniversary of Church. 
GREENWAY — Ground-Breaking for new Educational Building, November 2, 1975. 
MIDDLE FORK — Paid off parsonage debt. 

PROFFIT'S GROVE — Added Pastor's study to church; purchased church bus. 

RICH MOUNTAIN — Entered new building; appointed Carter Moretz, Youth Director. 

SOUTH FORK — New piano donated to church in memory of Clint Reid by his family. Dedication was held 4th Sunday 
in September 1975. 



7 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



THREE FORKS — Celebration of 185th Anniversary; completion of new educational building. 
WHITE ROCK — Began sponsorship of a missionary to School for Deaf in Jamaica. 
WILLOW VALLEY — Paid for new Sunday School rooms and Nursery. 

MINISTER OF EDUCATION 

James W. Churchwell, Rt. 3, Box 21A, Boone 28607 Boone, First 

MINISTER OF RECREATION 

Art L. Williams, 102 Ferncliff Road, Boone 28607 Greenway 

L. B. Trexler, Rt. 1, Boone 28607 Three Forks 

CHURCH MISSIONS COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN 

Mrs. Polly Jones, Greenway Road, Boone 28607 Greenway 

STEWARDSHIP CHAIRMAN 

Lee Warnock, Box 491, Blowing Rock 28605 Blowing Rock, First 

Mrs. Loyce Edmisten, 210 Morningside Dr., Boone 28607 Greenway 

Joseph McNeil, Rt. 1, Box452, Vilas 28692 Oak Grove 

Edsel Hodges, Rt. 1, Boone 28607 Rutherwood 

MINISTERS OF YOUTH 

Bruce Dickerson, Box 371, Blowing Rock 28605 Blowing Rock, First 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Miller, Rt. 2, Vilas 28692 Cove Creek 

Art L. Williams, 102 Ferncliff Road, Boone 28607 Greenway 

Kerry Krider, Fleetwood 28626 Laurel Springs 

Delmar James, Sugar Grove 28679 Proffit's Grove 

Boyden Atwood, Rt. 1, Boone 28607 Rutherwood 

Ricky Norris, Rt. 1, Box 196, Boone 28607 South Fork 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Roscoe Brown, Rt. 1, Elk Park 28622 Beech Valley 

Henry Oakes, Rt. 3, Banner Elk 28604 Beech Valley 

Dr. C. O. Hodges, Box 263, Blowing Rock 28605 Blowing Rock, First 

George A. L. Cook, Rt. 1, Box 321-A, Vilas 28692 Cove Creek 

Collis M. Austin, Rt. 3, Boone 28607 Greenway 

Guy Norris, Rt. 5, Boone 28607 Howard's Creek 

Jack N. Greer, Rt. 5, Box 416, Boone 28607 Howard's Creek 

Rodney Howell, Fleetwood 28626 Laurel Springs 

Edward Stokes, Oak Grove Road, Boone 28607 Mabel 

Johnny Hayes, Homespun Hills, Boone 28607 Middle Fork 

Bill Stanbery, Rt. 2, Boone 28607 Meat Camp 

Lee Greer, Banner Elk 28604 Mount Calvary 

J. W. Norris, P. O. Box 448, Boone 28607 Oak Grove 

Bill Hartley, Farthing Street, Boone 28607 Perkinsville 

Tommy Dotson, Rt. 1, Boone 28607 Pleasant Grove 

Mace Fletcher, Rt. 3, Boone 28607 Poplar Grove 

S. B. Brown, Sr., Rt. 1, Boone 28607 Rutherwood 

Tommy Jones, Meadowview Drive, Boone 28607 South Fork 

Farthing Hayes, Rt. 2, Boone 28607 Three Forks 

Walter Edmisten, Rt. 5, Box 309, Boone 28607 Three Forks 

William H. Smith, Rt. 1, Box 286, Banner Elk 28604 White Rock 

Carter Matheson, Rt. 1, Vilas 28692 Willowdale 

Alien Cornett, Rt. 1, Zionville 28698 Zionville 



8 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



PROGRAM 
THEME: LET CHRIST'S FREEDOM RING 
FIRST DAY - TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 1976 
PERKINSVILLE BAPTIST CHURCH 

MORNING SESSION 

9 : 00 Hymn— Onward Christian Soldiers No. 412 

Salute to the American and Christian Flags Perkinsville Church 

Scripture and Prayer Rev. J. R. Bouldin 

9:15 ORGANIZATION OF PROGRAM: 
Constitution of 136th Session 
Adoption of Order of Business 

Welcome Rev. Charles Allard 

Presentation of New Pastors Rev. C. 0. Vance 

9 : 25 Moderator's Address , James Marsh, Sr. 

10:00 Filmstrip: Foundation of Religious Freedom 

10:15 Report on Constitutional Amendment Rev. J. C. Jones, Jr. 

Missions Committee Report and 

Nomination of Superintendent of Missions Dr. Robert L. Newton 

Miscellaneous Business 
Recognition of Visitors 
Roll Call 

10:35 Hymn— Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory. Greenway Youth Choir 

10:40 OUR CONVENTION AT WORK THROUGH THE COOPERATIVE 
PROGRAM: 

Panel Discussion Bob Shepherd, moderator 

State and Home Missions Howard Ford 

Foreign Missions Dale Hooper 

Annuity Board Sam O'Neal 

Evangelism William C. Lamb 

11 :45 Hymn— America the Beautiful No. 489 

Special Music. Greenway Youth Choir 

Message Dr. Robert L. Newton 

12:30 Lunch 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

1 : 30 Hymn— Faith of Our Fathers No. 252 

Scripture and Prayer Rev. George Berry 

Filmstrip: Church and State-The Struggle Begins 

1:50 OUR ASSOCIATION AT WORK: 
Election of Moderator and Vice Moderator 

Nominating Committee Report Boyd Atwood 

Committee on Committees Report Rev. Robert Mann 

Treasurer and Auditor's Report Jerry Adams 

Camp Joy Report Mrs. Margaret Hartley 

2:40 Hymn — The Church's One Foundation No. 380 

2:45 Our Baptist Heritage Dr. Roy Carroll 

Benediction 



9 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



SECOND DAY - WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 4, 1976 



BRUSHY FORK BAPTIST CHURCH 



MORNING SESSION 



9:00 Hymn— All Hail the Power 

Welcome 

Scripture and Prayer , 



No. 1 

Dr. Charles Isley 

Rev. James Hagaman 



Filmstrip: Religion and the New Nation 

9:20 OUR CONVENTION AT WORK: 

Children's Homes 

Homes for the Aging 

Baptist Hospital 
Christian Literature 

Message. : Richard Smith 



10:00 Constitutional Amendment and 
Election of Superintendent of Missions 

10: 15 Hymn— Lead On, King Eternal No. 236 



10:20 OUR ASSOCIATION AT WORK: 
Sunday School 
Church Training 
Woman's Missionary Union 
Baptist Brotherhood 
Music Ministry 
Pastoral Support 
Church Libraries 

Message Rev. Earl Pym 

10:50 Place and Preacher Report Rev. Fred Reece 

10:55 Report of Resolutions Committee Dr. George Miles 

11 : 15 Special Music The Signs - R. A. M. Youth Group 

11:20 Message Rev. James Lambert 

12:00 Lunch 



AFTERNOON SESSION 



1 :00 Hymn— How Firm a Foundation 

Scripture and Prayer 

Filmstrip: Safeguarding Our Heritage 
l:20Singspiration 

1:30 Message 

2 : 00 Memorial Service 



No. 199 

Rev. Delmar James 



Mrs. Blanche Perry 



Dr. Forrest Feezor 



Dr. Charles Isley 



Benediction 



10 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



CONSTITUTION FOR THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



ARTICLE I — Name and Composition 

Section 1. This body shall be known as the Three Forks 
Missionary Baptist Association. 

Section 2 It shall be composed of the messengers of 
Missionary Baptist Churches in Watauga County and other 
Missionary Baptist Churches, co-operating with and sup- 
porting the work of the Association and of the State and 
Southern Baptist Convention, which may wish to unite 
with them. 

Section 3. Each church having fifty members, or less, 
shall be entitled to three messengers, and one additional 
messenger for each additional fifty members or fraction 
thereof: provided that no church has more than ten mes- 
sengers in addition to the pastor. The pastors of the 
churches and the duly elected officers of the Association 
shall be ex-officio messengers. 

Section 4. Any church failing to report the annual 
letter to the Association, or failing to be represented at the 
annual meeting, or failing to contribute to associational 
and denominational causes for two consecutive years shall 
be notified by the Executive Committee that if their failure 
is not remedied by the next annual meeting, recommen- 
dation shall be made to remove said church from Member- 
ship in the Association. 

ARTICLE II - Objects 

Section 1. The object of this Association shall be to 
devise and recommend measures for increasing the harmony, 
intelligence and spiritucil power of the churches, and for 
developing and directing their energies, their resources and 
gifts in winning and developing people in the Redeemer's 
Kingdom throughout the world. 

Section 2. For the better accomplishment of the above 
objectives this association shall, in so far as is practicable, 
cooperate with the Southern Baptist Convention and the 
Baptist State Convention of North Carolina. 

ARTICLE III — Officers and Committees 

Section la. Officers of this body shall be Moderator, 
Vice Moderator, Clerk, Treasurer, Sunday School Director, 
Church Training Director, Woman's Missionary Union 
Director, Brotherhood Director, Director of Evangelism, 
Historian, Music Director, Pianist, Director of Church 
Library Services, and Camp Joy Director. The Moderator 
and Vice Moderator shall be nominated and elected from 
the floor. Nominations for these other officers shall be 
made by a Nominating Committee consisting of six 
members appointed by the Committee on Committees 
as provided for in Section 2 of this Article, except that 
nominations for the Sunday School Director, Church 
Training Director, WMU Director and Brotherhood Director 
shall be made by their respective organizations to the 
Nominating Committee prior to the annual meeting of 
the Association. Nominations by these groups shall not 
preclude nominations from the floor. These officers shall 
be elected by a majority vote of the Association then in 
session. 



Section lb. Unless otherwise stated all officers and 
members of committees of the Association shall be eligible 
for re-election to consecutive terms. 

Section 2. The Committee on Committees shall be 
composed of five members appointed by the Moderator. 
This committee shall prepare for the approval of the Asso- 
ciation the names of individuals, provided these have been 
notified and have given their consent, to serve on the fol- 
lowing committees: Nominating, Missions, Finance, Asso- 
ciational Properties, and Associational Trustees. It shall 
also be the duty of this committee to name, for the 
approval of the Association, individuals to serve as repre- 
sentatives in the Association and to bring to the Association 
annual reports on the following causes: Baptist Hospital, 
Children's Homes, Homes for the Aging, Annuity Board, 
Biblical Recorder, Christian Education. The Committee 
shall also provide for reports on Christian Stewardship, 
Memorials, Public Morals, and such other reports as may be 
deemed necessary and desirable. 

Section 3. The Associational Executive Committee 
shall be composed of one lay member elected by each co- 
operating church, the pastors of such churches, the officers 
of the Association, and the members of committees as pro- 
vided for in Sections 1 and 2 of this Article. Ten members 
of this Committee shall constitute a quorum to transact 
business, after notice of such meeting has been mailed or 
otherwise given to all members of the committee as least 
three days prior to the proposed meeting. The Executive 
Committee shall act as the Association ad interim. The 
Moderator shall call a meeting of this Committee as soon as 
practicable after the annual associational meeting to plan 
for such regular meeting as may be necessary and desirable. 
Churches are requested to elect their lay member and 
include his or her name and address in the associational 
letter. 

ARTICLE IV — Duties of Officers and Committees 

Section 1. The Moderator shall be elected for a one- 
year term and cannot succeed himself after the second con- 
secutive term. He shall preside over the annual meeting of 
the Association and the meetings of the Executive Com- 
mittee. He shall be an ex-officio member of all committees. 
He shall be a fraternal visitor, counselor and advisor with 
the churches regarding their work during the year. The 
Moderator shall appoint the following committees in 
advance of the annual meeting: 

a. A committee on enrollment, which shall be composed 
of members of the host church. This committee shall 
arrange for the registration of all messengers and visitors 
at the annual meetings. 

b. A committee composed of three members on place 
and preacher, whose duty it shall be to recommend to the 
Association the churches at which the next annual session 
of the Association shall meet and the preacher for the 
annual sermon and his alternate. 

c. A committee on resolutions expressing appreciation or 
sentiment on any matter chosen by the committee or 
directed by the Association. This committee shall receive 
all resolutions presented to the Association and shall study 
them and make recommendations to the Association con- 
cerning them. 



11 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



/ 



d. A committee on order of business, which shall 
include the Moderator, Clerk, Host Pastors, and the Asso- 
ciational Missionary. This committee shall prepare a pro- 
gram for the annual meeting and present a printed Sug- 
gested Order of Business at the beginning of the annual 
association for its adoption. 

Section 2. The Vice Moderator shall be elected annually 
for a one-year term and cannot succeed himself after the 
second consecutive term. He shall preside in the absence 
of or at the pleasure of the Moderator. He shall serve as 
Chairman of the Missions Committee and as Vice Chairman 
of the Executive Committee. 

Section 3. The Clerk shall be elected annually and may 
be re-elected for consecutive terms. The clerk shall distri- 
bute blank letter forms to the clerks of the churches affi- 
liated with the Association. He or she shall keep an accurate 
record of the proceedings of the body in regular session 
and of the sessions of the Executive Committee. The Clerk 
shall perform the services of statistician, filling in from the 
church letters a digest of the records of the churches which 
shall be presented in duplicated form to the messengers at 
the annual meeting. The Clerk shall arrange for the printing 
and distribution of the minutes of the Association as soon 
after the annual meeting as practicable. The Clerk's annual 
compensations shall be $100.00, or such amount as may 
from time to time be determined by the Finance Committee. 

Section 5. The Song Leader and Pianist shall lead the 
sessions of the Association in worship through sacred 
hymns and appropriate music. The Song Leader shall 
encourage better worship through music in the churches of 
the Association. 



Section 6. The Superintendent of Evangelism shall 
work with the churches and pastors of the Association to 
achieve a positive and effective program of evangelism in 
each church. He shall lead in the promotion of simultan- 
eous revivals in the Association when these are determined 
to be feasible and desirable by the Association or by the 
Executive Committee. 

Section 7. The Associational Librarian shall encourage 
and assist the churches of the Association in establishing 
and maintaining church libraries. 

Section 8. The Camp Joy Director shall administer 
Camp Joy and encourage its use by the churches and organ- 
izations of the Association. The Director shall consult with 
and be assisted by the Missions Committee in planning a 
program of activities and providing for the general use of 
the Camp. 

Section 9. The Organizational Leaders — Sunday 
School Superintendent, Training Union Director, WMU 
President and Brotherhood President — shall lead in the 
promotion and development of the work of their respect- 
ive organizations in the churches of the Association. 

Section 10. The Associational Historian shall collect and 
put in some durable form all facts of interest about each of 
the churches which serve as host to the Association in its 
annual session. He shall endeavor to collect and preserve 
historical materials relative to the churches and the work of 
the Association. 



Section 11. The Missions Committee shall be composed 
of ten (10) members elected as provided for in Article HI, 
Section 2 above, provided that this committee shall include 
a representative of the Associational Sunday School, 
Training Union, WMU, and Brotherhood organizations. 
The Vice Moderator shall serve as chairman of this 
committee, and the Associational Missionary shall be an 
ex-officio member of it. It shall be the duty of this com- 
mittee to: 

a. Coordinate and help promote all phases and activities 
of the Associational Program. 

b. This Committee shall work closely with the Associa- 
tional Missionary, and shall act as an advisory council in 
matters related to the successful discharge of duties per- 
taining to his office. 

c. The Missions Committee shall promote and develop 
new Missionary Baptist churches in areas where needed, 
using the aid and assistance of local churches. 

d. It shall provide information and assistance to the 
Department of State Missions of the North Carolina Baptist 
State Convention in meeting local missionary needs, such as 
missionary pastor's assistance, promotion of mission causes, 
etc. 

e. This Committee shall consult with and give guidance 
and aid to churches anticipating membership in the Asso- 
ciation, and shall bring to the Association recommendations 
of petitionary letters from such churches. 

f. The Missions Committee shall give advice and assis- 
tance, by invitation from the church concerned, in the or- 
dination of ministers and the constitution of new churches, 
having always the freedom to call on the ministers of the 
Association to form councils or otherwise give assistance in 
such matters. 

g. The Missions Committee shall consult with and give 
assistance to the Director of Camp Joy in planning acti- 
vities and providing for the general use of the Camp. 

h. The Missions Committee shall name individuals to 
report to the Association on Association, State, Home, and 
Foreign Missions. 

i. The Missions Committee shall meet prior to the 
meeting of the Executive Committee, or at any other time 
necessary to the discharge of its duties. 

Section 12. The Finance Committee shall be composed 
of five members elected as provided for in Article III, 
Section 2. The duties of this Committee shall be: 

a. To prepare and submit an associational budget to the 
Association at its annual meeting for the work of the 
following year. 

b. To endeavor to secure the cooperation of the churches 
in raising the budget. 

c. To allocate surplus funds in the treasury over and 
above what is required for budgeted items, to objects of 
the Association where most needed. No officer or com- 
mittee shall have authority to make purchases, contracts, or 
obligations binding on the Association unless there is an 
itme in the budget to cover the obligation, and funds are 
available in the treasury, without the prior approval of the 
Association or the Executive Committee. 

Section 13. The Associational Properties Committee 
shall be composed of three members elected as provided 
for in Article III, Section 2. It shall have general oversight 
of the Associational Missionary's home, the Associational 
office with its equipment and supplies, and over Camp Joy. 



12 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



It shall make recommendations to the Finance Committee 
and to the Association or the Executive Committee on 
matters relating to the upkeep of the Missionary's home 
and the needs necessary for the efficient administration of 
the office of Associational Missionary. This Committee 
shall have the duty of making recommendations to the 
Association or to the Executive Committee on matters 
relating to the upkeep of Camp Joy. The Committee shall 
have general oversight to see that approved repairs and im- 
provements are effected. The Camp Joy Director shall 
be ex -officio member of this Committee. 
Section 14. There shall be three Trustees elected for a 
term of three years each, but terms shall rotate so that one 
member is elected each year, as previously herein provided. 
It shall be the duty of the Trustees to act as the legal re- 
presentatives of the Association in all matters relating to 
law, and to sign all legal documents as directed by the Asso- 
ciation, or the Executive Committee, to hold in trust any 
property, endowment, or other securities of the Association, 
and to exercise the power, under the instruction of the 
Association or the Executive Committee, to hold, buy, 
sell, and convey property, both real and personal and to 
sign all papers necessary for the purchases or conveyance. 

Section 15. The office of Superintendent of Missions 
shall be filled upon recommendation of the Missions Com- 
mittee and by a two-thirds majority of the messengers 
voting at the annual meeting or by a two-thirds majority 
of the Executive Committee voting during any regular 
meeting. By virtue of his office the Superintendent of 
Missions shall be considered an officer of the Association 
and an ex -officio member of all committees, unless other- 
wise stipulated. The services of the Superintendent of 
Missions shall continue so long as the relationship is mutually 
agreeable. 

ARTICLE V — Amendments 

This constitution may be changed or amended at any 
regular meeting of the Association by a vote of two-thirds 
of the members present, provided notice to the change 
be read at the Association during the morning of the first 
day of the annual meeting. 

BY-LAWS 

1. The Association shall convene annually on Tuesday 
and Wednesday following the first Sunday in August unless 
otherwise determined by the Association of Executive 
Committee. 

2. The Associational year shall begin July 1st of each 
year and close June 30 of the following year. 

3. All questions of order shall be decided by Kerfoot's 
Parliamentary Law. 

4. The written reports of this body, with exception of 
that of the Executive Committee and the Associational 
Misisonary, shall be limited to 500 words. In case a report 
is longer, the clerk is hereby authorized to revise the report, 
maintaining the salient facts. 

5. The Officers and Committees of the Association shall 
cooperate with the Associational Missionary in the pre- 
paration of an Associational Calendar of Activities, which 
shall be made available to each church of the Association. 

6. The expenses incurred by the Clerk in printing the 
minutes and preparing the statistical report, the Committee 
on Order of Business in printing their Suggested Program, 



and all promotional expenses authorized by the Association 
shall be paid by the Treasurer. Churches of the Association 
are requested to make a liberal contribution for these pur- 
poses when submitting their church letters to the Clerk. 

7. There shall be a Committee of Seven to act as a 
Council on Ordination of Ministers and Constitution of new 
churches. The work of this committee shall be purely at 
the invitation of the churches involved. 

8. The By-Laws may be changed at any session by a 
vote of majority of the Messengers present. 



13 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



PROCEEDINGS 
of the 

ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-SIXTH 
ANNUAL SESSION 
Held With 

PERKINSVILLE AND BRUSHY FORK CHURCHES 
Tuesday August 3, 1976 - Wednesday August 4, 1976 



FIRST DAY 

1. The 136th Annual Session of the Three Forks 
Baptist Association met Tuesday morning August 3, 1976 
at Perkinsville Church. 

2. At 9:00 a. m. James Marsh, Sr., moderator, 
announced the hymn "Onward Christian Soldiers." With 
Mrs. William C. Lamb at the piano, Adrian Littlejohn, 
minister of music at First Baptist, Boone, led in singing this 
hymn. 

3. Mrs. Ann Cook, Perkinsville Church, led in the 
pledges of Allegiance to the American Flag, held by Debra 
Cook, The Christian Flag, held by Jamie Moten and the 
Bible, held by Steve Limbacher. 

4. J. R. Bouldin, pastor of Cove Creek Church, read I 
John 1, commented and led in prayer. 

5. James Marsh called the meeting to order and 
presented the suggested program for the two-day session. 
Motion was made to adopt, it was seconded and so ordered. 

6. Charles Allard, pastor of Perkinsville Church, gave 
a cordial welcome to the messengers and visitors assembled. 

7. C. O. Vance, Interim Missionary, presented the 
new pastors: J. R. Bouldin, Cove Creek; Lester Carson, 
Gap Creek; George Berry, Middle Fork; and Delmar James, 
Proffit's Grove. These were present. He also mentioned Bill 
Warren, Clark's Creek, (he was present the second day); 
Maurice Ward, Bethany and Friendship; Ray Greene, 
Timbered Ridge; Quincy Norris, Zion Hill; Stanley Cabell, 
Rutherwood; and Lawrence Hagaman. These were not 
present. (Mr. Hagaman was present the second day.) 

8. The Moderator, with appropriate words, on be- 
half of the Association, presented C. O. Vance a watch 
for his untiring efforts as part-time missionary the past 
nine months. 

9. James Marsh commented on the report of the 
Executive Committee found in the Book of Reports. 
In his Moderator's Address he took for his subject, 
"Running a Race for God." His challenge was to start 
the day with God, end the day with God, use every hour 
of the day and deny self of things that keep us from doing 
our best. He closed with the 23rd Psalm. 

10. Dr. Robert Newton, pastor of Blowing Rock, 
First Church, introduced the filmstrip' "Foundation 
of Religious Freedom," and told of others that would 
be shown in coming sessions. James Churchwell presented 
this and the other filmstrips. 

11. J. C. Jones, Jr. presented the Constitutional 
Amendment proposed by his committee and authorized 
at the Annual Session of the Association 1975. 

Article IV, Section 15, Page 9 of 1975 Annual. 



Section 15. The office of Associational Missionary 
shall be filled upon recommendation of the Missions 
Committee and by a two-thirds majority of the messengers 
voting at the annual meeting. In case of a vacancy when 
the Association is not in session the Executive Committee 
shall call a missionary until the next session of the Associat- 
ion if a two-thirds majority of the Executive Committee 
is present and voting. By virtue of his office the Asso- 
ciational Missionary shall be considered an officer of the 
Association and an ex-officio member of all committees, 
unless otherwise stipulated. The services of the Asso- 
ciational Missionary shall continue so long as the relation- 
ship is mutually agreeable. 

REVISION 

Section 15. The office of Superintendent of 
Missions shall be filled upon recommendation of the 
Missions Committee and by a two-thirds majority of 
the messengers voting at the annual meeting or by a two- 
thirds majority of the Executive Committee voting during 
any regular meeting. By virtue of his office the Super- 
intendent of Missions shall be considered an officer of 
the Association and an ex-officio member of all com- 
mittees, unless otherwise stipulated. The services of the 
Superintendent of Missions shall continue so long as the 
relationship is mutually agreeable. 

Mr. Jones made a motion this be considered 
and the vote taken on Wednesday morning at 10:00 o'clock. 
It was seconded and so ordered. 

12. Robert L. Newton presented the report of the 
Missions Committee as found in the Book of Reports 
and commented fully on the recommendation of the 
Missions Committee that Rev. Earl Pym, Wadesboro, N. C. 
be called as Superintendent of Missions. The Missions 
Committee were unanimous in their recommendation, 
they had presented it to the Executive Committee in 
regular session and they, too, were unanimous in recom- 
mending Mr. Pym to the Association. This would be 
presented to the Association for their approval or dis- 
approval on Wednesday morning. 

13. At the roll call 34 churches answered, 20 pastors 
were present and at 10:20 o'clock 192 had registered. 

14. The Youth Choir from Green way Church stirred 
hearts with their rendition of "Mine Eyes Have Seen 
The Glory." The congregation joined in the last chorus. 

15. A highlight of the morning program was a panel 
discussion of "Our Convention at work Through the 
Cooperative Program." Bob Shepherd, president of the 
General Board of the Baptist State Convention, was mod- 
erator. He explained how the General Board and the 
Baptist State Convention operates. 



14 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Dale Hooper, missionary on furlough from Kenya, 
Africa spoke on Foreign Missions. 

Dr. Howard Ford, Baptist State Convention, 
presented State and Home Missions. All 80 Associations 
have at some time been aided through State Missions and 
churches and associations are still being helped to get 
on their feet. There is a cooperative relation and plan 
of endeavor between State and Home Missions. Southern 
Baptists are standing on the threshold of the greatest 
advance in missions in- their history as they participate 
in the BOLD MISSION THRUST as planned. 

Cecil Fox, Canton, N. C, effectively explained 
the operation of the Annuity Board and urged all churches 
who had not already done so, to enter their pastor in 
the plans of the Board. 

William C. Lamb, Chairman of Evangelism, men- 
tioned the work Youth were doing this summer under 
the guidance of the Baptist State Convention, and Youth 
Evangelism Night August 13th at Greensboro. He es- 
pecially emphasized the CARE program in the spring 
of 1977: C-cultivate people; A-activate the inactive; R- 
revive people; E-enjoy fellowship. 

Harold White, Director of Stewardship, suggested 
a Stewardship Chairman in each church, each church con- 
duct some type of stewardship emphasis, increase Cooperat- 
ive Program gifts, give a suggested amount to associational 
missions and have a special prayer for some Cooperative 
Program item in every service during October, Cooperative 
Program Month. 

16. The hyr^in, "America The Beautiful," was sung. 

17. "I Love America," was sung by the Youth Choir 
of Greenway Church. 

18. Robert L. Newton brought the morning message. 
He read Mark 11: 11-19 and led in prayer. He spoke of 
what Jesus saw on his visit to the temple and asked the 
question, "What would Jesus see in our churches today? 
Would it be worship and service, would it be worldliness 
or a genuine concern for people, would it be division or 
evangelism?" He closed with prayer. 

19. Lunch. 



AFTERNOON SESSION 

20. The afternoon session was opened with Mrs. 
Kathleen Ward at the piano and Randy Marsh leading in the 
singing of "Faith Of Our Fathers." 

21. George Berry, pastor of Middle Fork Church, read 
Psalm 113 and led in prayer. 

22. The filmstrip: "Church and State - The Struggle 
Begins," was shown. 

23. Mr. Marsh expressed appreciation to Duane 
Thomas for the work he had done in making pictures of 
each Baptist Church in the Association for the 1976 
Annual. This was at no cost to the Churches or Association. 

24. When the election of the Moderator and Vice 
Moderator was called for, Robert Mann placed in nom- 
ination the name of Robert L. Newton as moderator, J. C. 
Jones, Jr. made a motion nominations cease and Dr. 
Newton be elected by acclamation, it was so ordered and 
the congregation stood in approval. J. C. Jones, Jr. nomi- 
nated Charles Allard as vice moderator, Herbert McCoy 
moved nominations cease and he be elected by acclamation, 
it was so ordered and the congregation showed their 
approval by standing. 



25. Boyd Atwood, Chairman of the Nominating Com- 
mittee, presented the suggested officers for the coming year 
and moved their adoption. It was seconded and approval 
was voiced with a loud "Amen." (This list is found in the 
Associational Directory.) 

26. Robert C. Mann, Chairman of the Committee on 
Committees, presented their nominations and moved their 
adoption. A second was offered and again approval was 
voiced with an "Amen." (This list is also found in the Asso- 
ciational Directory.) 

27. Jerry Adams had passed out copies of his 
treasurer's report previously but made one addition. There 
is a balance due on the Camp Joy property of $4,031.43. 
He moved the adoption of the report, it was seconded, 
there was no discussion and it was so ordered. 

28. Mr. Adams then presented the Proposed Budget 
for 1976-77. Dr. Paul Caudill moved the Budget as 
presented, be accepted, it was seconded and discussed. 
J. C. Jones, Jr. moved to amend the motion by leaving the 
$600.00 for Convention Expense as listed. (It was already 
included in the $14,500.00 salary of the Superintendent of 
Missions.) This was seconded and the amendment was 
adopted. The motion as amended was accepted. 

29. Mrs. Margaret Hartley commented on her report 
on Camp Joy found in the Book of Reports and moved its 
adoption. It was seconded and discussed. Jerry Adams 
suggested a treasurer for Camp Joy be elected and that 
account be kept separate from the general fund of the Asso- 
ciation. This was referred to the Executive Committee 
who would suggest a treasurer. Mrs. Hartley spoke of the 
many groups using Camp Joy this summer but her desire 
was to see a spiritual program planned for the Camp which 
would include Bible study and teaching. Her report was 
received. 

30. Jack Lawrence made a motion the Book of 
Reports as a whole be accepted as printed, it was seconded 
and so ordered. 

31. The congregation sang the hymn, "The Church's 
One Foundation." 

32. Mr. Marsh introduced Dr. Roy Carroll, chairman 
of the History Department of ASU, who spoke on "Our 
Baptist Heritage" or the better title, "Our Christian 
Heritage." He protrayed vividly what was suffered to give 
us religious freedom. He emphasized that a vital Christian 
faith will affect the way we live and the way we die. When 
we take religious liberty and freedom for granted we are 
taking for granted what we have no right to take for 
granted. "All men are not equal - all men are created 
equal", was a striking statement. 

33. The first day of the Association was brought to a 
close with the benediction by J. C. Jones, Jr. 

34. Total registration for the first day was 228. 

35. These visitors were recognized the first day: Rev. 
and Mrs. Howard Cook; Mr. and Mrs. Marse Grant; Rev. and 
Mrs. W. C. Lamb; Rev. and Mrs. Earl Pym and David; Rev. 
and Mrs. Cecil Fox; Rev. and Mrs. Bob Shepherd; Rev. 
Dennis Wilson; Harold M. White; Dr. Howard J. Ford; Rev. 
Dale Hooper; Andy Greene; Mrs. Bill Spencer; Edwin 
Coates. 

SECOND DAY 
BRUSHY FORK BAPTIST CHURCH 

36. At 9:00 a.m. Wednesday August 4th the Three 
Forks Baptist Association reconvened at Brushy Fork 
Church for the final session of 1976. James Marsh, Jr. 



15 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



mentioned the first day's registration of 228 which was the 
largest in several years. 

37. With Mrs. Ruby Perry at the piano and Dr. Charles 
Isley leading, the session was opened with the singing of 
"All Hail The Power." 

38. Since Brushy Fork Church was without a pastor at 
this time, Dr. Isley, Minister of Music, extended a cordial 
welcome to the messengers and visitors. 

39. James Hagaman, pastor of Rich Mountain Church, 
read Philippians 4:8, commented briefly and led in prayer. 

40. James W. Churchwell showed the filmstrip: 
"Religion and the New Nation!" 

41. Since Dr. Cecil Ray could not be present because 
of the illness of his wife, Richard Smith, Business Manager 
and Comptroller of the Baptist State Convention, spoke. 
He told how the Cooperative Program and State Mission is 
at work through our Children's Homes, Homes for the 
Aging, Baptist Hospital, Biblical Recorder and the many 
agencies Baptists support in the State. 

Calvin Knight further emphasized the ministry of the 
Baptist Hospital, which is known nationally and inter- 
nationally for its services and especially its Pastoral Ministry. 
He answered questions from the congregation to make clear 
his statements. 

James Lambert mentioned how the Biblical Recorder 
Keeps Baptists up-to-date on important news, not only in 
North Carolina but across the Southern Baptist Convention. 
It is a line of communication between church and people. 

Bill Poole stated that ground breaking for the new Home 
for the Aging in Asheville would be held in October and 
work would begin in the spring. He answered questions as 
to how applications were to be made for admission to the 
Homes. 

Charles Bennett, new resident director of Mills Home, 
mentioned his work with the Children's Homes. He said, 
"It is a sacred trust to deal with children." 

42. Adrian Littlejohn led in singing, "Lead On, O King 
Eternal." 

43. J. C. Jones, Jr. presented the amendment to the 
Constitution which had been read on Tuesday and so did 
not read it again. He moved its adoption, it was seconded 
and discussed. The Committee was to continue working on 
the Constitution with other possible changes to be made. 
Dr. Caudill called for the question and the amendment 
carried with one "No" vote. 

44. John D. Cook gave the brotherhood report which 
was received as presented. 

45. Dr. Newton presented the recommendation from 
the Missions and Executive Committees, that the Rev. Earl 
Pym be called as Superintendent of Missions. He discussed 
the guidelines the Superintendent would follow and stated 
a copy would be in the next newsletter. He made a motion 
Mr. Pym be called, it was seconded, the vote was by 
standing and it was so ordered. 

46. The roll call found 31 churches represented with 
20 pastors. Every cooperating church was represented 
either the first or second day of the session. 

47. Rev. Earl Pym was welcomed as Superintendent 
of Missions by James Marsh, Jr. Mr. Pym accepted the call 
and spoke his approval of the reports on Sunday School, 
Church Training, WMU, Brotherhood, Associational Mis- 
sions, etc. as found in the Book of Reports. He gave as his 
definition of associational missions, "An associational fel- 
lowship of churches on mission in a given location". There 
is a divine mission for every association: a mission of fel- 
lowship, love and trust, strength and growth, training, to 



provide human and financial resources, organizational 
development, outreach and support. He mentioned the 
BOLD MISSION THRUST which is a three-year program 
designed to give every person in North Carolina an oppor- 
tunity to hear the gospel and every Christian an opportun- 
ity to witness to the love of God. 

48. Dr. Caudill presented Mrs. Clyde Perry to the 
Association. She is 86 years old and has been coming to 
the Association since she was 10 years old. Her father, 
W. S. Farthing, was for many years, moderator of the 
Association. 

49. Randy Marsh sang, "Were You There When They 
Crucified My Lord?" 

50. Rev. Fred Reece, pastor of Oak Grove Church, 
presented the report on Place and Preacher. The report 
was accepted. (This is found in the Associational Direc- 
tory.) 

51. Dr. George Miles gave the report of the Committee 
on Resolutions and moved its adoption. It was seconded 
and so ordered. (This report is found in the section of re- 
ports.) 

52. James Lambert, Area Missionary, spoke of the 
work being done through R. A. M. — Resort Area Ministry 
— in campgrounds and resort areas in Watauga and Avery 
Counties. He introduced The Signs, a folk team, who sang, 
told something of the work they are doing here and spoke 
of it as a diversified work since they did not know from day 
to day what opportunities would present themselves. They 
paid special tribute to the Cooperative Program and the 
part it played in their work and education. 

Mr. Lambert brought the morning message based on 
2 Corinthians 8:9 and 1 Corinthians 11:26. It is our priv- 
ilege to lose ourselves in service to God and share our fel- 
lowship so we can be the salt of the earth. We will never be 
what God wants us to be until we are the salt of the earth. 
If we reign with Him we must suffer with Him. 

53. John Cook pronounced the benediction and asked 
the blessing on the noon meal. 

54. Lunch. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

55. The hymn, "How Firm A Foundation," opened 
the afternoon session. 

56. Delmar James, pcistor of Proffit's Grove Church, 
read 1 Corinthians and led in prayer. 

57. The filmstrip: "Safeguarding Our Heritage," was 
shown. 

58. Miss Martha Lawrence and Randy Marsh sang, 
"Sweet Holy Spirit." 

59. With Dr. Charles Isley leading, the congregation 
enjoyed singing some of the newer gospel songs of today: 
"His Name Is Wonderful;" "I've Got Peace Like A River;" 
"He Touched Me;" and "Alleluia." 

60. James Marsh, Sr., introduced Dr. Forrest C. Feezor 
to bring the last message of the day. Dr. Feezor read 
Psalms 1 and Acts 14:27. He stated we are to be congratu- 
lated because somewhere we were met by the Holy Spirit 
and we responded; we are subjects of the grace of God; we 
are saved to be instruments of our Lord Jesus to bring those i 
outside the community of God into the presence of God. 
The greatness of God is found in the proclamation of the 
gospel from the pulpits of the churches. If righteousness 
disappears from the churches then America will lose her 
greatness. He concluded with prayer. 



16 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



61. Mr. Marsh passed the gavel, the symbol of respon- 
sibility in the Association, to Dr. Newton and asked every- 
one to support him and Mr. Pym so that the next year will 
be the best year yet. 

62. Mrs. Blanche Perry read the names of OUR BE- 
j LOVED DEAD and while the congregation stood in rever- 
ent silence Ray Minton, pastor of Willow Valley Church, 
led in a prayer of thanksgiving for their lives and pro- 
nounced the benediction. 

63. The second day registration was 203. 



64. Visitors recognized the second day were: Mr. and 
Mrs. Richard D. Smith; Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Knight; Charles 
Bennett; Bill Poole; Miss Pitts Hughes; Rev. Boyce Brooks, 
Rev. Dennis Wilson; Rev. and Mrs. Earl Pym and David; 
Mr. and Mrs. G. B. Wyman. 

James Marsh, Sr., moderator 
Mrs. Blanche Perry, clerk 



17 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



BAPTIST MEN 
John D. Cook 

The primary objective of the Three Forks Baptist Men 
as an association is to encourage the men of the Association 
through their own churches to discover their talents for 
mission service, and to direct men into personal involve- 
ment in mission service as Associational Brotherhood or 
Baptist Men Directors. May I encourage every man to get 
involved in mission activities through your own church. 
Some mission opportunities can best be accomplished 
by men working together. Various approaches can be used 
to increase concern for missions, equip you for the task 
and involve you in missions. Consider yourself either a 
missionary or a mission field, and do something about it 
by getting involved. My challenge to every man and every 
church is to work diligently at the task of promoting mis- 
sions and missions involvement for and through the men 
of your church. Don't wait on someone else to start and 
do the job. May I encourage you as pastor or church mem- 
ber, as a man to do something about your responsibility 
to God to work as a man in missions in your church. I was 
involved in four churches helping them in Baptist Men work 
and I will be more than glad to help you in any way I can. 

HOMES FOR THE AGING 
Mrs. Blanche Perry 

Your North Carolina Baptist Homes have completed 25 
years of growth and development. These have been good 
years, filled with the abundant blessings and goodness of 
the Lord. He has brought us from one Home, in March 
1951, to five Homes and an excellent Nursing Facility, 
from one resident to 230 residents and patients. Hundreds 
have been ministered to during these years, many lives 
have been blessed, and families have been helped immeasur- 
ably. 

The past year has been one of special excitement and en- 
thusiasm as we entered into the Fund-Raising Effort to 
raise $1,000,000 for the construction of the Western 
North Carolina Baptist Home in Asheville. In September 
1975, Ralph Cannon was called by the Trustees to serve as 
Director of Development and Denominational Relations 
and has been leading the fund raising program for the new 
Home in a remarkable way. The response from our Baptist 
pastors and people in Western North Carolina has been 
most encouraging. We are grateful not only to those in 
Western North Carolina, but throughout the State, for the 
response we have experienced thus far as we inove toward 
making this additional Home available for our older people 
in one of the most beautiful spots in the world. 

When completed, the Home in Asheville, will accommo- 
date 50 people, and will bring the total capacity of our 
Baptist Homes and the Nursing Care Unit to 280. We now 
operate five other Homes, and a Nursing Care Unit. These 
are located in Winston-Salem, Albemarle, Hamilton and 
Yanceyville. 

In these Homes the best of care is given, the compassion 
and love of Christ shared and underscored. The love gifts 
of North Carolina Baptists make this Christian care and 
concern possible through two very vital sources — the 
Cooperative Program and the Special Offering for the 
Home received on the third Sunday of February each year. 
Through these sources more than 35% of the Homes' 



total income is provided, and the majority of the residents 
who cannot pay the full cost of care are supplemented. We 
are grateful for these and thank every North Carolina Bapt- 
ist who makes them possible. Gifts this year are greater 
than ever before, and if we are to meet the overwhelming 
needs of older people in our midst, we must double and 
triple our efforts, both in numbers ministered to, and sup- 
port of them. 

Close at hand is another venture in the development of 
the Homes which is exciting — the building of apartments 
on the site of the Hayes Home property in Winston-Salem. 
The first of these units is to be completed by the fall of 
1977. Those interested in this phase of the ministry of 
Baptist Homes may contact Bill Poole, the Executive Di- 
rector, of the Homes for information. 

Great things are in store for us as we look to the future, 
and we covet the earnest prayer and the continual support 
of every North Carolina Baptist as we move ahead in this 
challenging ministry to older people in our midst. 

ASSOCIATIONAL PROPERTIES 
Mrs. Margaret Hartley 

During the past associational year the Associational 
Missionary's Home has been mostly vacant because of the 
absence of a Missionary for our Association. Properties 
in this respect remain primarily the same as last year with 
the same needs still there as far as improvements needed 
are concerned. 

Our Associational Camp — Camp Joy — which is located 
in the Silverstone Community on some 15 acres of land 
consisting of three buildings, has had some very helpful 
improvements since last year. The kitchen has had around 
$5,200.00 renovation work completed and is in much bet- 
ter condition to be of service to all those who use the 
Camp. The ball field has been graded along with part of the 
entrance to the Camp (thanks to Paul Brown) and has had 
grass sowed (thanks to Hiram Brooks) which was very bad- 
ly needed and has been a great improvement to the Camp. 

There are many more improvements which need to be 
made at the Camp in the future to make it what it should 
be to be the most effective for those who come. However, 
with the fine cooperation of the Association and dedicated 
individuals throughout the Association, these will be made 
in the future as God sees fit for them to take place and His 
will is carried out. The same holds true for the future of 
the home for our Associational Missionary. 



CAMP JOY 
Rudy and Margaret Hartley 

This past Associational CAMP JOY year has been very 
exciting and busy and we believe, fruitful. Several churches 
in our Association have used the camp or plan to use it 
before late fall. Some family reunions have been held and 
we have had some "outside our Association" churches to 
use the camp. (We are now charging $1.00 per person per 
night for all outside groups who use the camp and $25.00 
per day for family reunions. This has brought some money 
into our Association for the camp and been a blessing, 
too.) As renovations continue to be made, interest contin- 
ues to rise as to the iuture of the camp. We see the day 
when the camp can be used almost all the time. 



18 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Our Camp Committee has met several times during the 
past year and has planned two Pancake Jamborees to raise 
money for the renovations — one in September 1975 and 
one in June 1976. Because of the cooperation of so many 
individuals in the way of money and time donations, we 
made a total of around $900.00 on them. The Camp Com- 
mittee also planned the renovations for the kitchen and has 
talked extensively of future needs for the camp. They dis- 
cussed the possibility of having each church make a picnic 
for the camp. Plans were pursued and thus far we have 
received nine tables with promises of more. The tables 
which have been received are all very nice and we can now 
seat more than 75 persons comfortably for an outside 
gathering. 

Renovations which have been made on the kitchen in- 
clude some new wiring and plumbing, a new roof, guttering, 
new asbestos siding, windows, doors, deck porch and the 
entire building has been painted. The ball field and part 
of the entrance to the camp has been graded and sowed in 
grass and looks much nicer. 

Because of the Association as a whole being willing to 
give money specifically to help pay off the land debt and 
because many churches have given lump sums or give each 
month from their church budgets, we now owe very little 
on the land we purchased almost two years ago. We are so 
grateful to all of you. 

We have many plans for the future for Camp Joy. Some 
of them include: winterizing and installing some type of 
heat in the dining hall and kitchen and in the bunk house 
so we can benefit from the camp on an almost year-round 
basis. As far as recreation is concerned we would like to 
possibly make a tennis court or two and get some play- 
ground equipment. Other improvements will include a bath 
house, a prayer garden, and outdoor worship area on top 
of the mountain, completion of the picnic area, bar-b-que 
grills, general ground clean-up, entrance beautification, 
etc. In years to come we feel we will need more sleeping 
facilities and with the land we have purchased we have sev- 
eral building sites for this. 

Most importantly for the future, however, we want to 
have a good camping program for young people. Also, we 
would like to offer similar opportunities to adults, as their 
need is also great. We want to offer a place where people 
can come and receive much to help them grow as a 
Christian but even greater, the possibility of seeing many 
come to know Jesus Christ as their Saviour. We feel this 
is the greatest need of all for Camp Joy. Let's all pray 
that God will use this Camp to do just that and work to- 
ward that end. 

Thank you each and everyone for everything you have 
done in and way. 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 
Mrs. Norman L. Reese 

In a year commemorating freedom and liberty our WMU 
has used the latter part of 2 Corinthians 3:17, "Where the 
Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty," as their Watchword. 
Like Paul, our liberty was bought with the life of God's 
Son, Jesus Christ. Knowing this we try to serve Him 
through our WMU. Since its beginning, WMU has existed 
for the purpose of supporting and promoting missions. 
WMU seeks to do this through teaching and involving per- 
sons in missions through mission action, praying, giving 



and creating an environment in which persons can hear and 
respond to God's call to mission service. 

September 12-13, Miss Martha Franks, retired mission- 
ary to China and Taiwan, led us in a Prayer Retreat at 
Greenway Church. 

Miss Jolene Ivey and Miss Pat Richie, State Directors, 
and our Associational Directors led the Leadership Confer- 
ences at Perkinsville Church September 29th. These confer- 
ences were well attended and we were challenged to the 
importance of our youth being involved in mission organ- 
izations today. 

The Baptist World Day of Prayer was observed at the 
Oak Grove Church November 2nd with Mrs. Faye Turnmire 
Fincannon, former missionary to the Philippines, as guest 
speaker. 

During this year we have placed special emphasis on our 
Baptist Young Women. Our Associational Baptist Young 
Women organized November 6, 1975 with Miss Sharon 
Parlier, preseident and Miss Nancy Greene, secretary. 
April 1st, 7 6 enjoyed a banquet at Rutherwood Church 
using "Let Christ's Freedom Ring," as the theme. They 
sponsored an associational mission action project to place 
new hymnals in the Department of Corrections in Boone. 
They also promoted buying new mattresses for Camp Joy. 

Dr. R. Paul Caudill led us on a "Tour of Baptist Medical 
Missions Abroad" November 2nd at Brushy Fork Church. 
This preceeded the Foreign Mission study on Medical and 
Benevolent Ministries and the Week of Prayer for Foreign 
Missions. Our churches reported exceeding their goals for 
the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering. 

In preparation for our Week of Prayer for Home Mis- 
sions and the Annie Armstrong Easter Offering an Associa- 
tion-wide Mission Study was held at Oak Grove Church 
March 1st. Rev. Herbert McCoy, Rev. and Mrs. C. O. 
Vance, Mrs. Ann Cook, Miss Kathy Ward and Mrs. Sharon 
Gragg presented the studies of "Missions for the Third 
Century." 

Six churches were represented at the State WMU Annual 
Meeting in Greensboro March 16-17. Our Associational 
WMU was awarded the Distinguished Achievement Award 
for the past year. This is the highest level of achievement 
for an Associational Woman's Missionary Union. 

The 63rd Annual Meeting was held at Howard's Creek 
Church May 4th. Nineteen churches were represented with 
approximately 225 present. A skit, "Beginnings of WMU," 
prepared by Mrs. Blanche Perry, was presented. Mrs. Daisy 
Adams made the following recognitions: Mrs. Hattie Lewis, 
charter member of WMU and first Associational Secretary; 
Miss Ann Sherwood and Mrs. Grace Bingham, charter mem- 
bers of WMU (absent because of travels in Europe); Associa- 
tional presidents that were present — Mrs. C. J. Farthing, 
Mrs. Don C. Perry, Mrs. John B. Robinson, Mrs. John E. 
Ward and Mrs. Norman L. Reese; Mrs. Nora Wilson, Direc- 
tor of Camp Joy, who retired in 1970 because of health 
conditions after 22 years. 

Mr. Burl Jones, student at Fruitland Bible Institute, 
was the scholarship recipient. 

Each lady was given a copy of the HISTORY OF WO- 
MAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 1912-1976. As members 
of WMU have sung the hymn for the year, "My Country, 
'Tis of Thee," they have praised God for their Christian 
heritage and religious liberty enjoyed in the United 
States. They have been reminded constantly of the liberty 
and freedom which comes from knowing Jesus as Lord 
and Saviour. 



19 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



PUBLIC MORALS 
Dr. Larry Keeter 

In the year of America's Bicentennial, it is fitting to 
reflect on the moral climate of Watauga County. The 
over-mountain men of our county participated in the 18th 
Century Revolution that brought our nation into being. 
Their values centered around the individual, freedom and 
self-government, love of the land and a strong personal 
sense of community. They fought and died to preserve 
these values. How stand these values in our county in 
1976? Are we keeping faith with that true revolutionary 
spirit of our ancestors who settled this county? 

These very values of our ancestors are threatened in 
1976. The Census Bureau surveys in 1970 show-that for 
the first time in the 20th Century and perhaps the first 
time in the history of the republic — the rural's eireas 
population is increasing faster than the urban areas. Why 
this urban-to-rural movement in the 1970's? The Southern 
mountains have become attractive for recreation and retire- 
ment and for manufacturing. Rural America is losing IV2 
million acres of land a year to subdivisions, recreational 
lar)d development, strip mining and soil erosion. In the 
past the increase in population has always had a detrimental 
effect on the sense of community and on the natural en- 
vironment. Can we continue to develop our county eco- 
nomically while at the same time preserving the love of the 
land and a strong sense of community? Will our individual- 
ism and self-government aid us in preventing the misuse of 
our natural resources and the pollution of our quality of 
life? Our ancestors believed that if we don't respect our 
land, water, and air, then we don't respect ourselves either. 

The values of our ancestors are rooted in the Bible. 
The Bible is clear in its concept of stewardship that we will 
be held accountable for our use or abuse of the creation. 
God declared that His Creation (land, water, air) is good 
and in our trust. We did not create them; they are commit- 
ted to us "for a season and then the judgment." May God 
the Creator enable us to be good stewards of His creation 
in Watauga County that we may preserve the values of our 
ancestors in this place. 

MISSIONS COMMITTEE 
Dr. Robert L. Newton 

The Missions Committee of Three Forks Baptist Associ- 
ation had as its main objective for the present associational 
year the recommendation of a new Superintendent of Mis- 
sions. This task was undertaken with great faithfulness, 
thoroughness and earnest prayer undergirding the search. 
The committee met first on August 18, 1975 shortly after 
the last annual meeting. During that meeting matters of 
salary, housing and office space were discussed as to our 
offer to a prospect for this position. A motion was made 
that we recommend to the Executive and Finance Com- 
mittees that we offer the new Superintendent a financial 
package of from $13,000 to $16,000 depending on his 
background and experience. This would include all re- 
munerations — housing allowance, car, insurance, salary, 
etc. 

Following this initial meeting, nine meetings of consider- 
able length were held as the search continued. In early 
meetings the committee tried to get a feel for the type of 
leadership we needed in our association. The "Search Com- 



mittee Composite" for a new General Secretary for our 
Baptist State Convention was studied. The committee 
members added a range of qualities that we felt would help 
to meet the challenge of this important position in our 
Association. Applications continued to come in by letter 
and telephone and a list compiled. Each of sixteen 
applicants for the positon were carefully screened by the 
committee. Further prayer and prayerful consideration 
brought the committee to focus successively on the con- 
sideration of three prospects. These interviews were greatly 
beneficial to the committee although they did not lead to 
a recommendation. 

An existing Guideline For Superintendent of Missions 
was reviewed and altered during this time period. This job 
description is included as an addendum to this report. 

Two interviews were held with Rev. Earl Pym, Associa- 
tional Missionary for Anson Baptist Association, during the 
early spring of this year. During the April 10th meeting 
and after careful and prayerful visits with Brother Pym and 
inquiries into his background preparations and ministry, 
he was asked by unanimous vote of the committee to con- 
sider a possible call to the work of our Association. A posi- 
tive response was received around ten days later. An unani- 
mous vote of recommendation of Mr. Pym was made to 
the Executive Committee meeting at the Oak Grove Baptist 
Church on June 27th. The Executive Committee unani- 
mously recommends his call to the annual meeting of the 
Three Forks Baptist Association on August 3-4. 

During these months our Association has been faithfully 
and effectively blessed by the leadership of two of its faith- 
ful members who have served us as Interim Superintendent 
of Missions. Brother Jim Lambert, Area Missionary for 
our Baptist State Convention, guided our Association fol- 
lowing the annual meeting through October. He was par- 
ticularly effective in leading us in a most successful World 
Missions Conference. He was succeeded in November by 
Brother C. O. Vance, former Home Missionary and Associ- 
ational Missionary (his contagious enthusiasm and "full- 
time effort" in a part-time position have blessed our work 
with growth and success.) 

Several programs as planned by the committee have 
highlighted the work of our Association during this past 
year. A two-day Deacon's Retreat held in September at- 
tracted an overflow and responsive group of Pastors, Dea- 
cons and their wives. This rewarding venture was led by 
Dr. Forrest Feezor and Dr. and Mrs. J. Winston Pearce. 
Another Deacon's Retreat is being planned for this 
September. 

A World Missions Conference, previously mentioned, 
was shared in by a number of our churches. They were 
led by Foreign, Home and Associational Missionaries who 
rotated among the churches each evening following a fel- 
lowship supper at one of several host churches. Our vision 
of missions was highlighted and our commitment to Christ's 
Kingdom deepened under the ministry of these dedicated 
servants of His. 

A Family Life Conference was considered for May but 
it was felt this could be planned more effectively during 
Family Life Month next year. The Executive Committee 
has voted $1,000 to underwrite this important cooperative 
effort. Our Pastors and people also shared in a Bicentennial 
celebration planned by our Watauga Ministerial Association. 

The various areas of work and service in our Association 
were carried out with effectiveness and success during these 
months. Reports appear in other sections of this annual. 



20 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



INTERIM-MISSIONARY'S REPORT 
CO. Vance 

I wish to express my deep appreciation for the joy and 
privilege of serving these few months as your interim-mis- 
sionary. This has been a most delightful ministry for us. 
Marie and I have been most pleased and impressed by the 
friendliness, warm welcome and wonderful spirit of all the 
churches in which we, have been privileged to minister. 
One of our greatest regrets is that we have had to decline 
many invitations and have been unable to worship with all 
the churches of the Association. The wonderful and appre- 
ciative spirit of the Missions Committee with which we have 
worked closely, the other associational leaders, the pastors 
and all the people has been great. 

In accepting this work, the Missions Committee said, 
"Since you will be working on a part-time basis, we are not 
making many suggestions but feel you should work in the 
places where you see the greatest needs and seek to keep 
the churches informed of the denominational activities 
through an occasional newsletter." This I have sought to 
do and I will not make a detailed report of the work but 
just say I have been quite busy during this time. 

The Missions Committee has recommended, and it has 
been approved by the Executive Committee, that the name 
of a man whom we believe God is directing to be our 
Superintendent of Missions will be presented for the 
approval of the Association in our Annual Meeting. He has 
served for several years as Director of Missions in one of 
our other Associations and has done a remarkable job. He 
is dedicated, qualified and will come to us in the same spirit 
and love with which God has blessed him elsewhere. 

Now a word about our Association. Sometimes it seems 
there has been an erroneous impression that the churches 
exist to carry out the programs of the Association, the 
State Convention and the Southern Baptist Convention. 
This, however, is not true. Actually, it is the other way 
around. The Conventions and the Association have always 
been an extension of the churches. The power and the pro- 
grams rest with the churches. I thank God for our Associ- 
ation and it is one of the greatest. Let us continue to in- 
crease our support and participation in it as we continue 
to work together for the glory of God. 



Our associational year started moving very fast. Our 
Deacon and Pastor Retreat was a great inspiration to start 
the new year. The session was blessed with such leaders as 
Dr. and Mrs. Winston Pearce and Dr. Forrest Feezor, surely 
God sent this group this way. We had a total of 220 for the 
Friday evening session and about 210 for breakfast served 
by Boone Jaycees. The fellowship was great — God's love 
was surely present. This year our Deacon and Pastor Re- 
treat will be on the 17th and 18th of September (Friday 
evening-Saturday morning). The director will be Dr. 
Robert Dale of the Sunday School Board, assisted by Mrs. 
LeRoy Parker, Vice President of the Baptist State Conven- 
tion. 

The World Missions Conference was most successful — 
twenty-one churches participated. The dates were Oct- 
ober 18-24. Rev. Jim Lambert did so much to make 
this conference a success. We all owe him so much for his 
work and a splendid plan developed and carried out. 

Charles Lsley in directing and leading the Singspirations 
did a wonderful job in bringing us all closer together and 
for periods of fellowship which mean so much. 

Margaret Hartley and her fine Camp Joy Committee 
cannot be thanked enough, you first have to go and see 
what they have done. 

Space will not permit me to give a full report, but I must 
mention some persons who have worked so hard — Jerry 
Adams, Ruby Reese, Nora Wilson, Blanche Perry, the 
Trustees — and so many others who have done so much. 
Jim Lambert for all his assistance and his unselfish dedica- 
tion to God's work. 

One team must be mentioned. Rev. C. O. Vance and 
Mrs. Vance filled the year as interim-missionaries. I say 
team because they have always worked on God's team. 
Rev. Vance gave so much of himself. He worked more than 
full-time even after his retirement. Surely his star will be 
brighter. Thank you both for a job well done — and you 
are still doing it. 

To all of you who have made a deeper commitment— to 
all who have said "use me" — to all who share God's love 
with someone — this is your Association at work and make 
the job of Moderator a challenge to ask God constantly for 
direction in being used to bring others to him. 

May God Bless You. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
James Marsh, Sr. 

Please allow me to thank each member of the Executive 
Committee for the spirit of dedication for following God's 
leadership and working together in a spirit of love and con- 
cern for all member churches of the Three Forks Associa- 
tion, and offering to non-participating churches prayer, 
guidance and support in all areas. 

With the resignation of Brother Donald Wilson as Super- 
intendent of Missions, the first task was for the Missions 
Committee to set guidelines for calling a new Superintend- 
ent of Missions. No committee could have worked harder 
than this fine group of men. After hours of prayer, days of 
long meetings, the Missions Committee completed a set of 
guidelines to follow in seeking the man to lead our Associa- 
tion as Superintendent of Missions. Truly we have been 
blessed by the dedication of this committee. More will be 
said about the work of this committee later in the report. 



PASTORAL SUPPORT 
Ralph Beshears 

The individual Southern Baptist Church looks to the 
pastor for leadership in all phases of its work, and as the 
Under-Shepherds. Three Forks Association is fortunate 
in having men of outstanding leadership ability both spirit- 
ual and otherwise. We are grateful to these men for what 
they mean to us and for their dedication to the enlarge- 
ment of the Kingdom of God in each of our lives. 

Along with the blessings afforded our churches through 
the ministry of these men comes the responsibility of the 
churches to provide the support necessary in order that 
the pastor may be able to give his time to the work to 
which God has called him. 

With the present state of the economy as it is today we 
need to examine our church budgets and make certain 
the salary paid the pastor is sufficient and in line with other 
professions. In addition, we must see that proper housing 



21 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



/ 



or housing allowances is provided; we must participate in 
the Retirement Plan through the Annuity Board; we must 
maike certain that proper health and hospital insurance is 
provided. 

It is necessary that any pastor in our Association travel 
many miles each year to visit the sick and minister to the 
needs of the members of his church. This costs money and 
unless allowances are provided for this he will have to pay 
these expenses. Each church should make available such 
funds as are necessary to compensate the pastor for this 
expense. Many churches provide an automobile for the 
pastor's use. We expect our pastors to keep abreast of new 
developments in his field and in the Denominational work. 
These expenses should be provided in order that he may 
be able to attend our Conventions as our representative. 

All pastors desire our spiritual support. In addition 
to making ourselves available to help him by participation 
in the church programs, much time should be spent in 
prayer in our pastor's behalf. 

EVANGELISM 
Fred W. Reece 

All churches have already received the booklet: "Growth 
Evangelism: An Evangelism Planning Calendar for Pastors 
of Churches, 1976-77." It contains suggestions for various 
evangelism emphasis for the local church for the coming 
new year including C.A.R.E. Revivals for 1977. The 
pastors and lay leaders of each church are encouraged to 
outline definite evangelism plans with adults and youth 
during 1976-77. 

There was an overflow in attendance of more than 2,600 
pastors and lay persons at the 30th Statewide Evangelistic 
Conference at the Civic Center Auditorium, Asheville, 
February 2-4, 1976. The theme was: "Freedom in Christ." 
The response from many persons indicated that this confer- 
ence was one of the best in several years. 

Lay persons and pastors continue to respond to the em- 
phasis on lay witness training through Lay Evangelism 
Schools. During the past 4V2 years, 14,284 youth and 
adults have participated in these schools from 1,150 
churches and 62 associations. During the last evenings of 
the 62 weeks of schools there have been 896 professions of 
faith made by youth and adults in their homes. 

About 525 youth and adults attended the Youth Minis- 
try Week June 14-18 at the North Carolina Baptist Assem- 
bly with the emphasis on youth evangelism, vocational 



guidance and recreation. Fifty-three different types of 
decisions for Christ were made by youth. 

Twelve thousand youth, pastors and adult leaders are 
expected to attend the 6th State-wide Youth Evangelism 
Night, August 13, at the Greensboro Coliseum. Barry 
Wood of Lubbock, Texas is the guest preacher and Larry 
McFadden of Gainsville, Florida is the guest soloist. Fol- 
low-up work by pastors and adults is always with youth 
who make decisions from communities across our state. 

Two summer youth evangelism teams are directing 
youth revivals and youth witness training in 18 churches 
across the state for a one week period in each church. Al- 
ready there has been an excellent response and youth are 
making decisions for Christ. 

The Division of Evangelism is continuing to cooperate 
with the Brotherhood Department in Lay Renewal and 
Ministry Evangelism Weekends. 

A new area of work will be Youth Evangelism Strategy 
with an emphasis on four phases: Leadership Family; 
Touch Ministry; Discipleship Groups; and Joy Explosion. 
W.O.W. — Win Our World — is included in this strategy and 
involves specific witness training for youth. 

Good reports have been received on evangelism clinics 
in associations, revival meetings and city-wide crusades 
during the past months. 

The 31st State-wide Evangelism Conference will be 
February 7-9, 1977 at the War Memorial Auditorium in 
Greensboro. 

Remember to pray daily for the work of evangelism in 
all the churches of our association, state, nation and world. 

VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL - 1976 
Jim Churchwell 

The Association Vacation Bible School Clinic was held 
on Tuesday, April 27th in the Three Forks Baptist Church. 

One hundred twelve persons registered during the Clinic 
which began at 5:30 p.m. with a 'sack -dinner' and con- 
cluded at 9:00 p.m. Twenty-two churches were repre- 
sented and eight pastors were present. The Associational 
VBS Team included: Jim Lambert, new work; Jim Church- 
well, General Officers; C. O. Vance, Adults; Donald 
Critcher, Youth; Mrs. Johnny Roten, Older Children; Mrs. 
Merle Johnson, Younger Children; Mrs. Hazel King, Older 
Preschool; Miss Jenny Gay and Mrs. Linda Vaudiford, 
Younger Preschool and Mrs. Loyce Edmisten, Exceptional 
Children. 



STATISTICAL REPORT 

A comparison between the reports received from 28 churches and the reports received from the same churches in 1975: 



Baptisms 

Received from Non-Baptist Churches 
Lost to Non-Baptist Churches ... 

Total Membership 

Sunday School Enrollment 

Church Training Enrollment 

W M U Enrollment 

Brotherhood Enrollment 

VBS Enrollment 

Mission Gifts 



1975 


1976 


GAIN 


86 


151 


65 


15 


14 




25 


9 




6,016 


6,142 


126 


3,596 


3,487 




815 


842 


27 


727 


738 


11 


169 


237 


68 


1,780 


1,797 


17 


$98,497 


$103,374 


$4,877 



LOSS 



109 



22 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 
Dr. Roy Carroll 

A careful reading of North Carolina Baptist history re- 
veals that a Baptist State Convention was organized prima- 
rily for the purpose of establishing a Baptist college. When 
the Convention was formed in 1830, there were two church 
academies already in existence, as well as the University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. However, Baptists wanted 
their own school. Wake Forest Institute was begun in 
1834. Five years later the Institute became Wake Forest 
College. Thus, Baptists in this state have been closely iden- 
tified with Christian higher education for 142 years. 

Today, the Christian higher education system of Baptists 
embraces six other colleges in addition to Wake Forest: 
Campbell, Chowan, Gardner-Webb, Mars Hill, Meredith 
and Wingate. Since 1944, these schools have been guided 
in their development by the Council on Christian Higher 
Education of the Baptist State Convention. The Council 
is the only organization of its kind in the Southern Baptist 
Convention and is one of the oldest educational coopera- 
tives in America. 

North Carolina Baptists continue to support their col- 
leges through the Cooperative Program and the Baptist 
College Day offering on Father's Day. 

The colleges continue to provide training for most of the 
pastors and other church staff persons who lead North 
Carolina Baptist Churches. 

Pastors have helped the colleges in their efforts to recruit 
Baptist young people by furnishing the names of high 
school students for contact by the colleges. 

The colleges pledge to North Carolina Baptist youth that 
financial aid is available to assist them in attending a Bap- 
tist college. No qualified student is turned away for finan- 
cial reasons. Grants, loans and work scholarships are avail- 
able. 

Baptist colleges are anxious to receive invitations to 
serve the churches and associations. Each of the colleges 
is prepared to send speakers upon request. 

In a secular world with its materialistic priorities, Baptist 
colleges are committed to the guidance of Christian values 
in the search for truth. Believing that God is the source 
of all knowledge and wisdom. Baptist colleges can urge 
students to search for truth in all areas of knowledge with- 
out fear. 

Baptist colleges reaffirm their gratitude for the support 
given through the Cooperative Program. We further reaf- 
firm our faith in and our support of the local church, and 
the broad programs of our denomination. 

NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST HOSPITAL 
Miss Susan Lawrence 

"Christian Stewardship" is a phrase frequently heard in 
staff meetings at Baptist Hospital. A continuing effort is 
made to help each employee, whatever his particular job, 
to realize that he is part of a team involved in a Christian 
ministry of healing. The difference this makes in the whole 
atmosphere of the hospital is evident to patients and 
visitors. 

One of the most significant recent developments in the 
continual updating and upgrading of medical procedures is 
the creation of a department of Family Medicine. This 



department provides primary health care for a limited num- 
ber of families, that is, the kind of all-round, ongoing health 
care normally provided by a family physician. At the same 
time the department offers training in family medicine for 
physicians who will enter this field of practice. 

Many of the physicians training in family medicine are 
receiving part of their clinical experience in small towns and 
rural communities under the auspices of the Area Health 
Education Centers (AHEC), created by the State legislature. 
It is believed and hoped that some of them will choose to 
remain in these areas for their permanent practice. 

The Pastoral Care Department continues to make its 
contributions toward the fulfillment of our stewardship. 
A chaplain is assigned to each area of the hospital and is 
responsible for providing a pastoral ministry to patients, 
staff and visitors in that area. 

Mother's Day gifts for the fiscal year ending June 30 
were $405,946.52 compared to a total of $390,000 for the 
preceeding fiscal year. 



BIBLICAL RECORDER 



The Old Testament prophet Hosea declared, "My people 
are destroyed for lack of knowledge." Because of a great 
information void concerning truth, Jeremiah also cried out, 
"Publish and conceal not." 

Just as in Old Testament days, communication still re- 
mains one of the most sensitive problems in our churches. 
Too many church members are misled because they are 
uninformed, poorly informed, or misinformed. Churches 
must take initiative to provide accurate information if work 
in the local church, association, and convention continue to 
show progress. 

Each year more churches understand the importance of 
providing the RECORDER for each family. Baptists have 
made encouraging progress in recent years through bold 
mission enterprises and this can be traced to better in- 
formed church members. Stewardship gains also go hand 
in hand with better communications. As an example, 79 
of the 80 churches which led their associations in per capita 
mission gifts last year have a RECORDER club. 

Each church needs to look at its budget carefully and 
then make provision to send the RECORDER to each fam- 
ily. Such action could be the difference between mediocri- 
ty and greatness in your church. 

Louie D. Newton of Georgia who has done more than 
any other person to interpret the value of Baptist state 
papers, said: "The best investment any church can make 
in furthering the Kingdom of God is to put the Baptist 
state paper in the homes of the membership. These papers 
are the packhorses of every phase of denominational 
life." 

If the RECORDER is not going to every family in your 
church, may this be the year that you take this step. 

HOME MISSIONS 
C. O. Vance 

This Bicentennial year in America is a challenging time 
to be a follower of Jesus Christ! The distressing problems 
our nation faces have cast upon us a pall of gloom and dis- 



23 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



trust. There are problems of energy crisis and character 
crisis, baffling economic inflation and moral permissive- 
ness, strains on marriage, and tension between races and 
ethnic groups. The people of our nation hunger for values, 
for meaning in life, for purpose and for faith in God. 
Southern Baptists, we believe are committed to help meet 
these needs, to the making of disciples of all persons 
through faith in Jesus Christ. 

1976 is seen by the Home Mission Board as a year of 
preparation for "Bold Mission Thrust." The Southern 
Baptist Convention has designated the years 1977-1979 
"Let the Church Reach Out — Bold Missions." The pur- 
pose of Bold Mission Thrust (BMT) is "to give every per- 
son in America the opportunity to hear the good news of 
Jesus Christ and to become a part of a fellowship of believ- 
ers by December 31, 1979." 

A few of the many efforts and activities of our HMB in 
crossing barriers with the gospel to make disciples for Christ 
include the following: 

An effective force of 2,200 well-trained missionaries 
are enlisted. The work of these is strengthened by 1,208 
student summer missionaries, 28 semester missionaries, 
34 Sojourners, also by 10,000 youths and adults through 
church -sponsored mission projects and 141 adults who 
served in Christian Service Corps. 

Missionary personnel, through the Church Extension 
Department, helped to start more than 200 Bible study 
fellowships and many of these will develop into new chur- 
ches. Last year the Division of Church Loans of the HMB 
consulted with approximately 1,500 churches regarding 
their needs and made direct loans for a total of 
$10,000,000 to 250 congregations. The Department of 
Language Missions works with 30 Language and Culture 
groups and supports almost 1,000 missionaries. During 
the past year the Christian Social Ministries distributed 
$44,000 for disaster relief needs in five states. 

In October 1975 a search committee was named by the 
Board of Directors to begin seeking a new Executive 
Director to replace Dr. Arthur B. Rutledge who will be re- 
tiring at the end of this year after serving 18 years with the 
Home Mission Board. 

The 1975 Annie Armstrong Offering for Home Missions 
lacked less than one tenth of one per cent of reaching the 
goal of $8.5 million. The 1976 goal is $9.5 million. 

Dr. Fred B. Mosely of the HMB says, "The Home Mis- 
sion Board is truly grateful to God for what the Coopera- 
tive Program has meant in reaching our land for Christ. 
In these times of need and opportunity, advances in home 
missions await Southern Baptists' genuine commitment to 
personal and cooperative stewardship of both life and re- 
sources. If all Southern Baptists were to faithfully tithe 
through their churches, at least five times the present funds 
could be channeled into challenging mission programs at 
home and to the end of the earth." 

BAPTIST CHILDREN'S HOMES 
James Lambert 

"Christian child care provided by the Baptist Children's 
Homes of North Carolina is a cooperative mission." From 
the earliest days some ninety years ago, those who have 
given it leadership have been dedicated Christians who 
sought to minister to children and their families in the spirit 
of Christ. This investment in the lives of hundreds of child- 



ren has been bearing its fruit for many years now, and con- 
tinues to do so. 

This "cooperative mission" has been shared in by thou- 
sands of people who have given their interest, prayers, and 
financial support. God has blessed this ministry and has 
used the combined efforts of these to bring healing and 
hope to many families whose problems and difficulties 
often placed their children in desperate need. Without this 
support given so faithfully through the years by Baptists 
across the state, and by other Christian friends, this cooper- 
ative venture in Christian child care would not have been 
begun, nor would it continue today to grow in its influence 
and capacity to minister. 

From its small beginning at Thomasville in the days of 
John Mills, the Baptist Children's Homes has grown from 
a small orphanage to an agency that is looked to as a leader 
in child care across the nation. New and innovative ideas 
are put into practice as the Children's Homes seek to be the 
best possible instrument possible in this "cooperative mis- 
sion." From the days when group living on one of the 
campuses scattered across the state was the only option, 
there has come the day of multiple services rendered by the 
Baptist Children's Homes. Foster homes, social work serv- 
ices for individuals and families, preschool child care, and 
services for unwed mothers are some of these. Emergency 
Shelters in Burlington, Charlotte and Forest City are help- 
ing children needing immediate assistance. Various pro- 
grams are being introduced continuously in an effort to 
provide the best possible care for children. 

You have been and are a part of all this "cooperative 
mission." Your interest, prayers and financial support 
make it possible. This is a rewarding and exciting ministry 
as one sees the unlimited possibilities of God working in 
the lives of children, giving them faith, hope and love at a 
time in life when they find very little of these in their lives. 

STATE MISSIONS 
James Lambert 

North Carolina is a mission field in every sense of the 
word. Within the boundaries of this state are people who 
are shut off from the gospel by all kinds of barriers and 
there is a tremendous need for a faithful and cooperative 
witness to these people. 

State Missions provides a ministry to the people in this 
mission field through the cooperative efforts of local 
churches throughout the state as they share their tithes and 
offerings through the Cooperative Program, a percentage of 
which makes possible Urban Ministries, Interracial Coopera- 
tion, Resort Ministries, Language Missions, the Chaplaincy 
Program, Fruitland Baptist Bible Institute, Seminary Ex- 
tension Centers, the Minstry to the Deaf, as well as others, 
totaling more than fifty different ministries. Each Septem- 
ber, the churches are asked for a special offering for State 
Missions, this year's goal is $300,000. to be used in under- 
writing the various ministries that strengthen the churches 
and lengthen their ministries throughout the state. 

Some of the State Missions ministries are co-sponsored 
by the Home Mission Board and each of them seeks to help 
to do what the local congregation by itself cannot do. By 
joining hands together, we have the possibility of providing 
ministries to people in the name of Jesus Christ that would 
be impossible by ourselves. The efforts through these min- 
istries of State Missions is a vital link in our responsibility 



24 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



for World Missions. 

State Missions seeks to build up the local church and 
association by providing training and help for the Sunday 
School, Church Training, WMU and Brotherhood, through 
conferences, workshops, and by providing resource persons, 
in order that the local church can better do its mission in 
its community. By helping in this way. State Missions 
is able to strengthen the work of the church in education, 
missions and evangelism. 

These efforts at missions in our state need your money, 
but, more than that, they need you and your prayers. Our 
responsibility is not alone in helping provide trained leader- 
ship, but in living out a definite commitment to be respon- 
sible for witness to North Carolinians. 

MUSIC MINISTRY 
Dr. Charles Isley 

Two Association-Wide Singspirations were held this year. 
The first was at Greenway Baptist Church February 29, the 
Fifth Fabulous Sunday. Seven choirs participated before 
a more-than-full house. The choirs included Greenway 
youth and adult choirs, Three Forks children, youth and 
adult choirs, Bethel choir, and the Brushy Fork adult choir. 

The second Singspiration was held at Three Forks Bap- 
tist Church on May 30th, with six choirs performing before 
an overflow congregation. Choirs represented were Three 
Forks Adult Choir; Bethel; two bell choirs from the Boone 
First Church; Perkinsville; Greenway and Brushy Fork. 

A county-wide choir was formed to sing at a special 
afternoon service at the Boone First Church on July 4th. 
The choir was composed largely of members from Three 
Forks Association Churches, and the musical selections 
performed were favorite songs from the Christian Harmony, 
used widely in the Association during the latter part of the 
19th century. 

The Singspiration participation continues to grow, and 
two more fifth Sunday programs are being planned for the 
coming year. 

CHURCH TRAINING 
Mrs. Nora M. Wilson 

During the bicentennial year we have made efforts to 
magnify the theme: "We Hold These Truths." 

The Church Training Council met 5 times during the 
year to evaluate and to plan for associational activities. 
Some of the Church Training leaders met with youth from 
the churches in 3 additional meetings to plan for Youth 
Night. 

In August 1975 a sheet was prepared giving information 
on associational activities through November 1975 — "M" 
Night, Deacon's Retreat, WMU Prayer Retreat, Church 
Training Conferences, WMU Leadership Conference, World 
Missions Week, Baptist World Day of Prayer, and a Bible 
Study on Ephesians. These sheets were distributed to all 
the churches by the associational Church Training leaders. 

Five associational activities were held to involve people 
from the churches, thereby strengthening their work. 

"M" Night was held August 31, 1975 at Boone First 
Baptist Church with 317 in attendance. Sixteen churches 
were represented, 14 pastors and 9 Church Training direc- 
tors were present. Some highlights of the meeting were: 



congregational singing, skit by Rev. and Mrs. C. O. Vance, 
special music by Greenway Youth Choir, and message, 
"Anchors of My Faith," by Rev. J. C. Jones, Jr. 

On September 22-23, 1975 Church Training conferences 
were held at Oak Grove Church. These were led by people 
from our State Church Training Department, giving much 
helpful information and inspiration to those present from 
9 churches — 27 on Monday and 24 on Tuesday. The rainy 
weather had effect on attendance, but not on the enthu- 
siasm of those leading and attending the conferences for 
leadership of Adults, Youth, Preschool and General Officers. 

As a follow-up to the conferences, an associational meet- 
ing was held on November 9, 1975 at Three Forks Church 
for the purpose of p£issing on information gained in the 
September conferences. Seven churches were represented. 

Associational Youth Night was held at Boone First Bap- 
tist Church on April 17, 1976 with estimated attendance 
of 200, about half of these were youth. It was a very im- 
pressive service on the theme: "Let Christ's Freedom 
Ring," with the processional of the flags and youth dressed 
in bicentennial costumes, the singing in keeping with the 
theme, and the message brought by Jerry Wayne Bernard. 
Several responded to the invitation for whatever was the 
individual need. After the service Boone Church served re- 
freshments in the Fellowship Hall. 

Children's Bible Drill was held on May 2, 1976 at 
Perkinsville Church with two participants — one from Oak 
Grove in the older children's drill and one from Cove Creek 
in the younger children's drill. This was the second year 
Jackie Tester took part without mistake in the drill for 
younger children. We trust that all of our churches will 
have children taking part in the Bible Drills during the 
year 1976-77. 

Let us join hearts and hands in Exploring Discipleship 
at Church: the Sunday Night Place 1976-77. 

COOPERATIVE PROGRAM 
Cannon G. Ward 

When Jesus said, "Upon this rock I will build my 
church," signifies to me that there is only one church and 
this church functions as the body of Christ. The church as 
we have it in our local communities is scattered throughout 
the hills, valleys and flatlands for the purpose of uniting 
communities in love to carry out the Great Commission 
of our Lord. The thing that impresses me is the fact 
that the churches under proper leadership can come togeth- 
er, not because they have to, but because of the constrain- 
ing love of Jesus in the hearts of men, again as the church 
in a cooperative effort to spread the gospel both in Jeru- 
salem and Samaria and to the uttermost parts of the earth. 
Where there is no vision the people perish. 

We can see in our Cooperative Program the greatest 
method ever devised to carry out the spirit of the Great 
Commission because it is all in the framework of Christian 
Love taught by our Redeemer. 

The Christian commitment that Jesus set forth involves 
a way of life or Christian Ufe style. When one turns his 
life over to the Lordship of Christ he discovers that the 
demands of discipleship involves all that he is, all that he 
has or ever will have, belongs to the Lord and is to be used 
to accomplish the mission of our Lord. 

In the year 1975 the church, in contributing our part to 
the Southern Baptist Convention and Foreign Mission 



25 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Board to support 2,667 missionaries in 82 countries and 
2,400 Home Mission employees plus 19,000 special workers 
and 900 chaplains. 

It is my prayer that all of our pastors could devote them- 
selves to the spirit of total commitment and in love could 
see the need of leading their people in cooperating together 
as the body of Christ that His mission could be accom- 
plished and His name glorified. OH FOR A THOUSAND 
TONGUES TO TELL! 



RESOLUTIONS 
Dr. George Miles 

Be it resolved that we, the messengers who compose the 
136th Annual Session of the Three Forks Association: 

1. Express our appreciation to the host churches, 
Perkinsville and Brushy Fork, to their pastors and members 
who so graciously provided for our comfort in so many 
ways, especially with the delicious noon meals. 

2. Express our appreciation to our moderator, Mr. 
James P. Marsh, Sr., who has so ably directed this 136th 
Annual Meeting and who has furnished such outstanding 
leadership through the past year. 

3. Express our appreciation to each individual who 
presented or helped to plan the programs of the Association 
meetings. 

4. Express our appreciation to the Reverend James 
Lambert and the Reverend C. O. Vance for their untiring 
efforts in behalf of the Association during this year when 
we have been without a Superintendent of Missions. 

5. Express our continuing concern and pledge our 
active opposition to the drug and alcohol traffic in our 
midst. 

6. And that we, the members of the Three Forks Bap- 
tist Association, in this bicenntennial year of our nation 
reaffirm our commitment to the teachings of Jesus Christ 
which have made this country great, and that we pledge 
ourselves to prayer and to His service through the combined 
efforts of individuals, churches, and the Association. 

BAPTIST FOUNDATION 
Dr. Robert L. Newton 

Southern Baptist Foundation is one of the investment 
agencies of Southern Baptists. It was established by the 
Southern Baptist Convention in 1947 "to encourage and 
motivate the making of gifts, donations, and benefactions 
by deed, will, gift, annuity contracts, or otherwise, for the 
advancement, promotion, extension, and maintenance of 
the various causes and objects now or at any time hereafter 
fostered by the Southern Baptists Convention." 

Its goals are: IT IS A SERVICE agency chartered in 
1947 to serve any person who wishes to contribute to any 
Baptist institution or agency by gift, bequest, gift annuity, 
or otherwise. 

IT WILL MANAGE the funds entrusted to it according 
to sound business practice and under the direction of 
successful businessmen. 

IT IS A FLEXIBLE agency. A gift may be directed 
through it to any institution or agency with such control- 
ling conditions as may be desired. Any instructions at- 
tached to a gift will be followed to the letter. 

IT RENDERS A BROAD service. One gift may be made 



to endow many institutions or agencies. These may be 
specified by the donor. 

ITS MAIN PURPOSE is to SERVE ALL Southern 
Baptist Convention agencies in all financial and investment 
matters perpetually. 

Fiscal 1975, ending September 30, was an outstanding 
year for Southern Baptist Foundation in spite of another 
traumatic year in the national economy. 

Additional growth of new funds received amounted to 
$2,377,514. Market values appreciated over the previous 
year-end $863,478. After withdrawals of $1,101,028, 
Southern Baptist Foundation still had a net growth for fis- 
cal 1975 of $2,139,956. For the first time in the history 
of the Foundation, earnings surpassed a million dollars in 
any given 12 months. Total corpus for all funds adminis- 
tered by Southern Baptist Foundation amounted to book 
value of $17,055,982. Market value at September 30 was 
$14,925,383. 

Southern Baptist Foundation is proud of its record over 
these years of its existence. Measured in percentage earn- 
ings dollarwise, it leads all agencies of the Southern Baptist 
Convention. Southern Baptist Foundation does not cost 
the Convention! It pays great dividends on every dollar 
allocated to it — more than ten times in earnings, plus many 
times that cost in added gifts accumulated in corpus, and 
incalculable benefits that will eventually come to various 
agencies of the Convention through wills and trusts. In 
addition, multiple thousands of dollars have been received 
by this agency for immediate remittal to other agencies. 

Notwithstanding these fantastic material blessings 
brought about through Southern Baptist Foundation, 
more lasting benefits will come to the donors and benefi- 
ciaries through eternal service to the promotion of the gos- 
pel of Christianity. 



NOMINATING COMMITTEE REPORT 
Boyd Atwood 

The following are recommended by the Nominating 
Committee: 

Clerk Mrs. Blanche Perry 

Treasurer Jerry Adams 

Sunday School Director James W. Churchwell 

Church Training Director Mrs. Nora Wilson 

WMU Director Mrs. Norman Reese 

Brotherhood Director John D. Cook 

Music Director Dr. Charles Isley 

Director of Library Services Mrs. Custer Wallace 

Director of Evangelism Rev. Fred Reece 

Director of Camp Joy Mrs. Margaret Hartley 

Asst. Director of Camp Joy Mrs. Alma Earp 

Historian Clyde R. Greene 

Pianist Miss Cathy Cottrell 



SUNDAY SCHOOL 
Ernest Dancy 

Jesus said, "Go ye therefore and teach all nations, 
baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the 
Son, and of the Holy Ghost: Teaching them to observe 
all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and lo, I 



26 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



am with you alway, even unto the end of the world." 
Matthew 28:19-20. 

God has blessed through the Sunday School in our Bap- 
tist churches in that souls have been won to Christ and are 
! receiving the teaching of God's eternal truths. 

During the past year emphasis has been placed on the 
Sunday School Action Plan. Some of our churches are in- 
I volved in this plan. God is blessing through the plan of 
reaching the lost with the gospel. We trust others will 
seek an understanding of this plan and seek God's will in 

j High Attendance Day in our Sunday Schools across the 
I Association last November was 4,050. We thank God. May 
1 we have a greater visision and desire to see the lost saved. 
The January Bible Study was in the book of Hosea. 

Many churches were involved in this study, 
i Reports from different churches concerning Vacation 

Bible Schools are coming in. God has done great things 

and is doing great things. 

May each of us join together in the unity of the Spirit 

and work together for the Glory of God. 



THE CHURCH LIBRARY 
Mrs. Lucille Wallace 

The church library as a resource center can provide the 
materials to be used in all church-related programs. 
Through the use of books, reference materials, periodicals, 
audio-visual aids and non-book materials each organization 
within the church can supplement the teaching materials 
available, and enrich religious knowledge to further the 
Christian ministry. 

The Association reported 17 churches with libraries in 
the last Annual. Let us pray that other churches may find 
a place of service to others through a media center. 

ANNUITY BOARD 
Roy Keller 

According to a report from our Baptist Headquarters 
Building at Raleigh, of the 45 churches comprising the 
Three Forks Association only 17 of them are participating 
with the pastor (and staff members) in the Southern 
Baptist Convention Annuity Board's Retirement Program. 

How many of these churches are paying on the MINI- 
MUM OF $4,000.00 PER YEAR? How many churches are 
paying the pastor's part? Because of inflation every church 
should be paying the pastor's part and should be paying 
10% on the total of the pastor's salary. 

The Retirement coverage is very essential to the physical 
and mental well-being of pastors and church staff workers 
in later years. However, with no assurance of pastor or 
staff member reaching retirement age, our Annuity Board 
has worked out an arrangement with a private insurance 
company whereby a church can provide for pastor or staff 
members Life and Disability Insurance which becomes 
effective in case of physical disability or premature death. 
(June 5, 1976 Biblical Recorder has story illustrating such 
an experience.) 

Every messenger to the Three Forks Association's 
Annual Meeting should ask his or her church's treasurer if 



the church is participating in the Retirement Program on 
full salary with the church paying the 10%. A second 
question should also be asked: "Is our pastor and staff 
member covered with Life and Disability Insurance?" 

This Life and Disability Insurance is vital especially if 
death should leave children to be educated. Sam H. O'Neal, 
P. O. Box 26508, Raleigh, NC 27611, can give a church the 
details and benefits of this plan. 



FOREIGN MISSIONS REPORT 
J. Charles AUard 

During 1975, Missionaries, nationals. Foreign Mission 
Board and staff members, and leaders across the Southern 
Baptist Convention reviewed the past, ministered in the 
present, and planned for the future of foreign missions. 
The Foreign Mission Board is now the largest evangelical 
missionary — sending agency in the world. 

Missionary appointments totaled 265, the largest num- 
ber ever appointed in a single year. Included in this number 
were 134 career missionaries, 29 missionary associates, 80 
missionary journeymen, 20 reappointments and 2 special 
project medical workers. 

Missionaries were evacuated from Vietnam, Laos, Angola 
and Mozambique because of war, invasion and uncertain 
political climates. Missionaries working in those 4 countries 
were transferred to other work. 

Evangelism was a major emphasis during the year in 
countries like Portugal, the Philippines, Hong Kong, Brazil, 
Kenya and Guatemala. As a result of these and other 
special evangelistic emphases plus the ongoing Christian 
witness of missionaries and national Christians, baptisms 
on the mission fields increjised in 1975, by more than 
10,000; from 70,712 in 1974, to 80,747 in 1975. Church 
membership grew by 66,191. 

National disasters in Honduras (hurricane), Bangladesh 
(floods and tidal waves), Brazil and parts of Africa (floods), 
brought response from Southern Baptists in the form of 
relief funds and special prayer services. 

Total receipts for Foreign Missions increased 7.57% to 
$52,006,639.00. Included in this total wert: 



Cooperative Program $20,667,748.00 

Lottie Moon Christmas Offering $23,480,144.00 

World Relief $ 1,673,841.00 

Designated Gifts $ 2,705,674.00 

Miscellaneous Income $ 3,479,232.00 



A BOLD NEW THRUST in Foreign Missions is being 
projected as we look toward 2000 A.D. Objectives are: 
(1) A 100% increase in missionary staff. (2) Expanded 
efforts in evangelism. (3) Increase in lay involvement. 
(4) Tenfold multiplication of churches. (5) Greater 
effort in leadership training. (6) Vastly incrccised use of 
mass media. (7) Accentuated attention to human need 
through health care, disease prevention, benevolent and 
social ministries. (8) Vigorous, appropriate and prompt 
response to desperate human need in crisis situations. 

In order to achieve these bold new thrusts in missions, 
we must look to God and the people in the churches. With 
God's blessings and help, and by the committed wills, 
lives, and actions of all Southern Baptists, these bold new 
thrusts in Foreign Missions can become realities in our life- 
time. 



27 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



IN MEMORIAM 





MOTTXIT PAT VARV 


ivir, udy ion "Ljitrenc 


Mrc ClalUT rjilliam 

ivirs. odiiy ijriiiidm 




ivirh. vjrrdce onooK vjwaitney 


IVli. o . iVl. onirrwooQ 


Mr. Jim Shomaker, Deacon 


ivii . \_/(jiiit:y iNLrrrib 






MOUNT LEBANON 


BLOWING ROCK, FIRST 


Mr. Odell O. Teague 


Mr. Robert Greene 


Mr. B. Frank Baird 


Mrs. Elizabeth Griffith 






OAK GROVE 


BOONE, FIRST 


Mrs. Vance Calloway 


Mrs. Lillie Lyons 


Mrs. OUie Greer 


Mr. G. D. Barnett 


Mrs. W. M. Hodges, Sr. 




Mr. Butler Perry 


BRUSHY FORK 




Mrs. Cindy Wilson 




Mr*; Reatha Wil<;nn 


Mrs. M. w. Lrreene, or. 


AyTv .liinp RnirH 

IVXl . CJLlllC 1 1 CI 1 L \Jl 


Mrs. Judd Barnes 


Lj i \ JTVIV O XV J-J Hi xv 






]\^r. Johnny Perry 




iviri>. iviyriie oiewart 




A^y* \A7ilI Tcoo/^c 
iVll . VV III lidclCo 


IVIiss C3rri6 Is3.3.cs 


Ayl»- Frl Porw-ic^n 

ivir. iLu i enneii 


Mrs. V6rgi6 Adams 


IMrs. Marie Perry 


ivir. donn ntrnry jjiiriKitry 






PROFFTT'C; riROVF 




ivir. tloe iviiuer, ueacon 


TV4»- A]r\r\7 r\ lVTill<=>r 

IVl 1 . X U 1 1 i U J. VI 1 1 1 tr 1 


Mrs. Ola Johnson 


Mr. Grady Triplett 






SOUTH FORK 


riRFFWWAV 


iVir. rtaipn rioweii 


IVTr Olpnn F Racran 
ivxi . vJitrmi xj . Xvagdii 




IV^y" Ti£i tn r^c £i\7 T \A7i 1 f> v 1 ■t* 
iVJl . Utrlll^atry 1j. VVIIL-UA., tJl. 


QTOMY FORK" 


ivir. U . ijtrt: oOULn 


ivir. xjuWara tianiDy 




Mrs. Ruby Shirley Simmons 


HOWARD'S CREEK i , 




Mr. Bart Norris 


TABERNACLE 


ivir. U. VV . OOOK 


Rev. Lewis Hodges 


LAUREL SPRINGS 




Mr. i-yiay Miner 


ivir. rJODDy riester 


IVIr. Flayrnond Watson 


Mrs. Vilas Cook 


A^v* Rii fiiQ Pi"ppnp 




Mrs. Channie Wilcox 


WILLOWDALE 


Mrs. Rosa Greer 


Mrs. Tom Potter 


MEAT CAMP ' 


^ WILLOW VALLEY 


Mr. Walter H. Greene 


Mr. J. Oscar Ward, Licensed Minister 


Mr. Benjamin B. Greene 




ZIONVILLE 


MIDDLE FORK 


Mr. Edward F. Wilson 


Mr. Edward Greene 





"And I heard a voice from heaven saying unto me, Write, Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord from hence- 
forth: Yea, saith the Spirit, that they may rest from their labors; and their works do follow them." Revelation 14:13. 

May we stand in reverent silence to their memory. Then in a prayer of thanksgiving for their lives, we will dedicate 
ourselves anew to the task to which they had committed themselves, the spreading of the gospel to the ends of the earth. 



28 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
TREASURER'S ANNUAL REPORT 
JULY 1 , 1 975 - JUNE 30, 1 976 



RECEIPTS: 


GEN. FUND 


CAMP JOY 


ANNUAL 








FUND 


Antioch 






3.00 


Beech Valley 


100.00 




30.00 


Bethel 


100.00 


149.00 


15.00 


Blowing Rock, First 


420.00 




7.00 


Boone, First 


3,520.79 


600.00 


37.50 


Brushy Fork 


1,500.00 


662.31 


37.50 


Clark's Creek 


55 00 






Cool Springs 






18.00 


Cove Creek . 


520 00 


436.00 


40.00 


Gap Creek 


120 00 




30.00 


Green way 


2 255 48 


3.00 


37.50 


HowarH'^i Oreek 


344.50 


39.20 


18.00 


Laurel Springs 


1,050.00 


330.00 


45.00 


Mabel 


180.00 


250.00 


22.50 


Meat Camp 


300.00 


37.50 




Middle Fork 


240.00 




22.50 


Mt. Calvary 


247.50 


50.00 


37.50 


Oak Grove 


1,300.00 


300.00 


45.00 




2,280.00 




37.50 






73.00 


37.50 


Popliu* Grove 


290.00 






Proffit's Grove 


60.00 


120.77 


45.00 




276.28 




9.00 


Rutherwood 


572.00 




37.50 


South Fork 


190.00 


54.25 


22.50 


Stony Fork 


110.00 




22.50 


Three Forks 


540.00 




45.00 


White Rock 


50.00 




15.00 


Willow Valley 


120.00 


74.00 


37.50 


Willowdale 


450.00 


50.00 


15.00 


Zion Hill 






10.50 


Zionville 


300.00 




30.00 




375.00 








20.00 












22.50 


Donald Critcher 


10.00 






Camp Joy - reunion rent 


60.00 






C. O. Vance 


25.00 






Refund (Baptist Book Store) 


10.02 






From General Fund Saving 


5,000.00 






Arron Baptist - Camp Joy use 


101.00 






Camp Joy Pancake Supper 


498.30 






Grace Bingham for Camp Joy 


10.00 






Replace light bulb 


.50 






Boone, First - Camp Joy use 


25.00 






Special offering 


64.76 






Greenway Deacon Conference 


25.00 








172.23 






Blue Ridge Electric fuel refund 


36.67 








3,214.33 






(see attached schedule) 








Mattie Low Bible Class - Mt. Calvary 




30.00 




E. D. Lewis 




50.00 






7,750.00 






Greenway Tuesday Night Circle 




30.00 




Sale of Chair 




2.00 





29 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Special Offering 

Sale of logs 

Pancake supper 

Baptist Student Union, ASU 

Special offering Association singing . . . . 

Total Receipts: 

Cash in Bank 7/1/75 

Deposited in Camp Joy Savings Account 



121.00 
75.00 

587.87 
60.00 

194.14 



$34.889.36 



$4,258.04 



$833.00 



$39,980.40 
968.59 
$40,948.99 
1,370.14 
$39,578.85 



ANNUAL REPORT 



DISBURSEMENTS 

Salary (Including travel) $5,617.36 

Annuity 416.74 

Hospital 58.48 

Life & Disability Ins 82.20 



Utilities: 

Phone 249.06 

Electricity 459.24 

Water & Sewer 55.50 

Fuel Oil 393.80 



Convention expenses 250.00 

Office expenses 356.25 

Insurance 372.00 

Clerk 300.00 

Organizations 293.27 

Camp Joy Maintanence 422.76 



Other unbudgeted items: 

Associational Annual 1,012.94 

E. O. Bustle - Car damage 100.00 

Camp Joy funds transfered to savings 1,616.34 

Camp Joy repair and remodeling 6,899.02 

Camp Joy property purchase 14,130.00 

Deacon conference 394.00 

Vacation time due missionary 259.60 

Gift for missionary 70.00 

Expense of prospective missionary 373.39 

Word, Inc 83.22 

Mission Conference expense 4,052.71 

Cash to Camp Joy Savings 55.00 



6,174.78 



1,157.60 



1,994.88 



$29,046.22 

$38,372.88 

Cash in Bank 6/30/76 1,327.13 

$39,700.01 

Adjusted disbursement 1^ 

$39,699.85 

Cash from Receipts to Camp Joy Savings 121.00 



Jerry Adams Treasurer 



$39,578.85 



30 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



MISSION CONFERENCE RECEIPTS 





MISSION 


LOVE 




EXPENSE 


OFFERING 




78.71 




Bethel 


100.00 


75.00 


Blowing Rock 


100.00 






89.05 


100.00 


Brushy Fork 




50.00 




100.00 


93.00 


Greenway . 


175.80 


140.00 




161.27 




Laurel Springs 


77.36 




Meat Camp 


100.00 




Oak Grove 


186.27 


76.35 


Perkinsville 


90.69 






88.72 


10.00 


Poplar Grove 


166.82 




Rutherwood 


186.00 




South Fork 


90.00 




Stony Fork 


87.65 




Three Forks 


97.74 


75.00 


Willowdale 


200.00 




Willow Valley 


193.90 


50.00 


Trinity 


75.00 






100.00 






$2,544.98 


$669.35 


ASSOCIATIONAL MISSION CONFERENCE DISBURSEMENTS: 






LOVE 




EXPENSES 


OFFERI> 


J. C. Wells 




54.00 


George Cowsert 




54.00 


Clarence Griffin 




54.00 


M. E. Cannup 






Joe Watterson 




54.00 


Mary Anne Chandler 




54.00 


Duprie Gowan 




54.00 


Fanny Starns 




54.00 


Wendell & Jane Parker 




108.00 


Mrs. Marvin Haire 




54.00 


Callie Brown 




54.00 


Jack Mahaffey 




54.00 


Marjorie & Herbert Caudill 




108.00 


Neal Peyton 




54.00 


Mrs. Edwdn Dozier 




15.00 


Leonard Rollins 




15.00 


Oliver Lawton 




15.00 


E. 0. Bustle 




54.00 


Bill Ballou 




54.00 


Alex Booth 






David Roberts 






Continuing Education Center 






Bud Spencer 




15.00 


Ernest Dancy 






Harold King 







$3,214.33 



31 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Givvs Motel ■ 25.53 

Rivers Printing 218.40 

Avery Journal 36.40 

Winn-Dixie 24.96 

Joseph Watterson 11.44 

Manuel Crump 54.00 

The Mitchiners 54.00 

Parker McLendon 54.00 

Calvin Knoght 15.00 

James Camp 15.00 

Howard Ford 15.00 

David Roberts 54.00 

James Lambert 23.65 



$2,813.71 $1,239.00 



$4,052.71 



SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 

ANNUAL REPORT 



General Fund Saving: 

In Savings on July 1, 197 5 $6,749.13 

Interest during year 144.41 

Total $6,893.54 

Withdrew to Pay on Camp Joy Property 5,000.00 

Balance in saving June 30, 1976 $1,893.54 



Camp Joy Savings: 

In Savings July 1, 1976 $4,427.62 

Deposited to fund during year 3,297.79 

$7,725.41 

Interest for year 137.86 

$7,863.27 

Withdrew during year for repair and remodeling of 

Camp Joy $7,750.00 

Total in fund June 30, 1976 113.27 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

PROPOSED BUDGET FOR 1976-1977 



Item: 

Salary $14,500.00 

Annuity 1,000.00 

Secretary 2,000.00 

Office supplies 800.00 

Office equipment 2,000.00 

Convention expense 600.00 

Camp Joy 500.00 

Insurance 500.00 

Organizations 300.00 

Clerk 400.00 

Utilities for office 1,800.00 

Miscellaneous 100.00 

Camp Joy 1,200.00 



$25,700.00 



32 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



HISTORY OF THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



About the year 1776, the South Carolina Association, 
in session, discussed the destitution along the Yadkin 
River, and passed a resolution requesting the Philadelphia 
Association, meeting in Philadelphia, to select and send 
some preacher to minister to the 14 settlements along the 
Yadkin River. These were scattered from the North Car- 
olina-South Carolina line to what is now North Wilkesboro 
in Wilkes County. ' In compliance with this request, the 
Philadelphia Association sent one Reverend John Gano. 
He immediately set out for North Carolina on horseback. 
This trip consumed six weeks, as this was the only mode 
of travel at that time, and roads were in many sections of 
the country almost impassable. He traveled and preached 
in the churches of these settlements, or at least to those 
who were needing him. These 14 churches had been or- 
ganized into the Old Yadkin Association in 1790. Mem- 
bers of the New River Church of the Three Forks Settle- 
ment were messengers to this meeting. It is interesting to 
note that at the first session of the Association, they 
petitioned the Virginia Association for the right to or- 
ganize a separate Association in North Carolina. This new 
Association (Yadkin) covered the entire territory from 
Salisbury, west as far as what is now Mountain City, Ten- 
nessee. 

Sometime within the ne.xt 50 years, there was another 
Association carved out of the Old Yadkin Association, 
known as the Mountain District Association, and from 
this Association was later, in 1840, the Three Forks Associ- 
ation organized. Thence we see that our organization came 
by the circuitous route through missionary effort from 
South Carolina Association to Philadelphia Association; 
from Philadelphia through the Virginia Association; then 
Yadkin, then the Mountain District Association, on to 
what is now the Three Forks Association. 

The territory that formed the Mountain Association 
embraced territory in North Carolina, East Tennessee and 
a small portion of Virginia. Three Forks, Ebenezer (now 
Zionville), Three Forks of the North Fork, South Fork, 
Old Field, Roan's Creek, Pine Grove and Cove Creek Chur- 
ches withdrew by letter from the Old Mountain Associa- 
tion and on October 5, 1841, met at Three Forks Church 
and organized the new Association and named it for the 
church in which it was organized. Three Forks. 

The first meeting of the Association was on Friday be- 
fore the first Sunday in September. The first day was de- 
voted to the annual sermon and the election of officers. 
The second day was devoted to business made up by a com- 
mittee on arrangements. The third day was devoted entire- 
ly to preaching. This form of conducting the Association 
went on for many years until the Association began to wid- 
en its scope and it had to have other committees to func- 
tion. The business session was devoted principally to dis- 
cussion of matters coming up from the churches — answer- 
ing questions the churches might ask on how to proceed 
with certain things. It is noticeable in all the proceedings 
that the Association never trespassed on the independence 
of the church. It issued no mandates, but merely gave ad- 
vice. 

The Three Forks Association has always been strong on 
preaching the Word. Sessions of the Association opened 
with a sermon until 1935 when the hour was changed to 
11:30. It was the custom from the beginning for some 
ministers to preach at various hours to the crowds on the 
outside. In the early days all Sunday was devoted to 



preaching. At Ebenezer Church in 1847, there were five 
sermons on Sunday, and a number of them were not of 
the modern variety in length. A change of date caused 
this custom to be abandoned. In 1923, because of distrac- 
tion to the session, outdoor preaching was abolished. 

One notable thing that the records show is that the lead- 
ers of the Association have always been believers in mis- 
sions. The Association has been careful to admit no 
church that failed to have missions in its Constitution. 

Another custom among the early days of the Associa- 
tion was during the session someone was appointed to 
write a circular letter to the churches in the Association. 
Rufus Moore of the Globe Community wrote the first one 
that is recorded in the minutes. This may be an echo from 
the New Testament custom of writing letters to the chur- 
ches. It was the means by which they kept the spirit of 
brotherhood and unity. 

The Association as early as 1856 took the subject of 
education seriously. It urged the members to educate 
their children and to look forward to the time when they 
could establish a Baptist school in the Association. In 
1874 a movement was started to build the Three Fork 
High School. Eventually a building was started in Boone 
but was not completed for a long time. Finally the 
Association agreed to give the building and grounds to the 
town if it would establish its own school. The property 
was finally disposed of in 1899 to the Watauga Academy. 

The Association joined the Baptist State Convention 
in 1887, in a session at Beaver Dam Church, and has been 
affiliated with that body ever since. 

At Antioch Church in 1893, the Association had under 
consideration the mission question. They split this time 
on the method of doing the work. Very able men debated 
the question on the method of doing mission work, but at 
the present time the majority of the churches carry on their 
mission work through the Convention. 

During the first years of the Association it seems the 
mission work was carried on by the pastors and local 
preachers without organized efforts. The minutes of 1874 
show that Elder D. B. Brown, as missionary, preached 70 
sermons and baptized 16 people and received a salary of 
$56.00. The next record of missionary work was the ap- 
pointment of Rev. Solomon Younce as Associational Mis- 
sionary in 1895 with directions to preach in destitute places 
and be helpful to the cause of Christ in any way possible. 
Later other men did the same type of work in many ways 
and places. The Association appointed Rev. Nathan Greene 
as Associational Missionary at Oak Grove in 1938 and he 
has been followed by others, both men and women, 
in all the years since. The work has grown until a full- 
time paid person oversees the greatly expanded work. The 
Association has been without a Missionary since August 
1975 but a recommendation will be made to call one at 
the Annual Session in August 1976. 

At the Spring Session of the Three Forks Association 
May 24, 1957 at Perkinsville Church the home of the Rev. 
and Mrs. Nathan Greene was formally presented to the 
Association by the Greene Family as a memorial to their 
parents. This property, consisting of an ample lot, a lovely 
dwelling and a store building which was converted into an 
office and headquarters for the Association, was to be used 
as a home for the Associational Missionary. It has been 
remodeled and occupied by the Missionary since that time. 

The Association in its session at Mulberry Church in 



33 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



1883 passed a resolution against the church members who 
made liquor. Before this date, there were churches who 
were strongly against the making, selling and using of strong 
drink. From that date on, at each session of the Associa- 
tion, there has been a report on this phase of the work. 
Leaders of the Association have always opposed the liquor 
traffic in any form. From time to time they have urged 
the ministers, teachers and members of the churches to 
fight the traffic with all their might. Baptists of Three 
Forks Association joined other Baptists and Christians in 
the state and were responsible for the defeat of the liquor- 
by-the-drink bill when it was presented in the State Legis- 
lature a few years ago. People today are indebted to Bap- 
tists for the firm stand they took on the liquor question 
years ago. 

The Baptist Children's Homes have always been a 
favorite of the Three Forks Association. Begun as the 
Baptist Orphanage at Thomeisville in 1885 a representative 
visited the Association that year in the interest of the 
Orphanage. At every session of the Association some 
friend has spoken a good word for the Children's Homes. 
In 1932 the trustees of the institution called one of our 
members, L G. Greer, to be its Superintendent. From its 
small beginning it has grown to be an agency that is looked 
upon as a leader in child care across the nation. Every 
church makes special offerings for this institution. 
Someone said, "He thanked the Lord this is one thing upon 
which all our churches are agreed." 

The first Sunday Schools in the churches were very 
crude affairs. For those who could not read, it was the 
Blue Back Speller. The object was to teach people who 
were not able, to read. They would take a chapter each 
Sunday and would read a verse each. Then the people 
began to see what the Sunday School should be and in the 
session of 1883 the Association recommended lesson helps. 
The first picture lessons that were used in the Sunday 
Schools for children aroused critical comment. One 
member, it is reported, when his child brought his pictured 
lesson home, said with strong language, "Who in the world 
wants to know anything about old Jeroboam?" 

So far as is known, the first Sunday School was or- 
ganized at Cove Creek in 1867 with Hiram McBride as 
Superintendent. Since then Sunday School has been a very 
important part of the work of the church and when a new 
church was organized a Sunday School was begun at the 
same time. In 1882, when the Association met at Flat 
Rock, 18 out of 25 churches reported Sunday Schools and 
Boone was evergreen, in other words, Boone had Sunday 
School all year. As late as the early 1900's many of the 
Sunday School would disband when winter came and re- 
organize in the spring when the weather became favorable. 
Some of the churches thought nothing of disbanding for 
the winter. 

Early in the 1900's Dr. Hight C. Moore held the first 
Sunday School Institute at Cove Creek Church. Later E. L. 
Middleton came as a worker in the Association and held 
institutes that lasted over the week-end. Every church that 
wanted a worker could have one for a week who would 
instruct them how to organize a Sunday School, how to 
increase attendance and how to train the teachers and 
officers. The same type of work is carried on today but 
usually with local leadership who have availed themselves 
of opportunities to further their education in Sunday 
School work under the instruction of capable workers who 
have given themselves to the study of how best to present 
the work to meet the needs of the youngest child to the 



oldest adult. Sunday School in 1976 is the strongest organ- 
ization in the church and influential in making the church 
the strong institution it is today. 

Woman's Missionary Union and the Baptist Brotherhood 
are the missionary organizations of the church. When the 
Three Forks Association met at Cove Creek Church in 
August 1913, the women met to perfect an organization 
which had been discussed at the session of the Association 
in 1912. Miss Blanche Barrus, Corresponding Secretary of 
the WMU of North Carolina, came to the Association that 
year and presented the plan of work to the women present 
at the Association. The women met in the school house to 
consider the adoption of the Constitution and By-Laws. 
The meeting was presided over by Miss Rose Edna Brown 
of Blowing Rock. After reading the Constitution and dis- 
cussing the plan of work, the Constitution was adopted and 
officers elected for the coming year. 

Following the Association three churches organized 
Woman's Missionary Societies; Blowing Rock, Boone and 
Cove Creek. Today there are 19 active WMU's, most with 
organizations for every age group. In addition to these, 15 
other churches have at one time had an organization. 

The Baptist Brotherhood was first organized in the 
1930's, and is for the men and boys what WMU is for the 
women and girls. As the names indicate, these are the 
missionary organizations of the church and their purpose 
is to promote missions. They do this by helping the men, 
women and young people to develop a world awareness, 
with appreciation for all people and concern for their 
needs; encourageing the development of the spiritual life as 
Bible study, family worship and observances of the Weeks 
of Prayer are stressed; showing the importance of sharing of 
possessions through tithing, the Cooperative Program and 
special mission offerings; cultivating missionary convictions 
in the hearts of our young people; and enlistment and 
training of leaders. 

Church Training, which was first known as Baptist 
Young People's Union or BYPU, and later as Baptist 
Training Union, was begun by two churches. Boone 
Church organized the first BYPU in 1916; Forest Grove 
soon followed in 1918. in 1921, F. M. Huggins, reporting 
on State Missions, suggested that the churches should en- 
courage organizations of BYPU for training and develop- 
ment of young people. The Moderator appointed a com- 
mittee on BYPU work to report at the next session. 
Reports have been given regularly in the associational 
meetings wince that time. By 1926 there was BYPU work 
in 11 churches. A step forward was taken in 1928 when an 
Associational Director was appointed. Under the leader- 
ship of these men and women the work has shown remark- 
able growth. 

With the addition of tournaments interest increased 
among the members: Bible Reading for Adults, Better 
Speaking and Sword Drills for Young People, and Memory 
Work and Bible Drills for Children. 

Church Training has grown from year to year. Many 
have worked faithfully in their own churches and the Asso- 
ciation, doing their part in the great work of Training for 
Service. 

Much of the progress of the Association has been since 
1940. During the 1940's eight new churches were or- 
ganized: Beech Valley, Friendship, Green Valley, Mabel, 
Mountain Dale, Perkinsville, Tabernacle and White Rock. 
As a direct result of the labors of N. M. Greene are Mountain 
Dale, Green Valley, Tabernacle and Perkinsville and he was 
the first pastor of these churches except for Mountain Dale. 



34 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



J. C. Canipe was active in the organization of the other 
churches. In 1953 Vanderpool Church was organized and 
in 1958 Greenway Church. This brought the number of 
churches in the Association to 46 but in 1974 Mount 
Gilead Church, a member since its organization in 1876, 
withdrew from the Association and reduced the number 45. 

The first Associational Camp for youth under the direc- 
tion of the WMU, was held in 1947 for Royal Ambassadors 
and Girl's auxiliaries at Camp Fiesta, now Camp Rainbow. 
For four years, camps were held in the home of Odes and 
Nora Wilson. By 1956 a bunk building and an assembly- 
recreation room had been added. The WMU and Brother- 
hood were faithful in the building of the camp, giving their 
time, money and prayers, and in the support of the camp 
and participation in camp activities. 

Later the property was deeded the the Three Forks 
Baptist Association and in 1974 an additional 10 acres of 
land adjoining the original 4'/2 acres was bought by the 
Camp Director, resigned in August 1970. Mrs. Margaret 
Hartley, present Director of Camp Joy, is very busy pro- 
moting the Camp and under her leadership many improve- 
ments have been made. The long-range plan is to make it 
available for year-round use. During the period from May 
through October the Camp is used by mciny groups from 
within the Association, North Carolina and other states, for 



day meetings, over-night retreats and week-long activities. 

In the early days of the Association the churches had 
two and sometimes three pastors, so that one would always 
be available to preach to the church at least once a month 
except in those instances when the church disbanded during 
the worst winter months. In the 1976 reports to the Asso- 
ciation all except 4 churches reported worship services 
every Sunday. 

Church music has always been important in the worship 
of the church. From the days of the old Christian 
Harmony used widely in the churches during the latter part 
of the 19th century and singing by note in the early part 
of the 20th century, to the present day, music director and 
21 have an active music organization. 

When the Association came into being in 1840 it was the 
custom to extend an annual call to a pastor. This continued 
almost without exception for the first one hundred years. 
In 1898, some far-seeing men, caused the Association to 
recommend an indefinite call. Today, with few exceptions, 
all churches extend an indefinite call to their pastor. 

From its beginning the Three Forks Baptist Association 
has been truly missionary, it has encouraged education, 
sponsored benevolence, fostered Sunday School and all 
other church organizations, fought the liquor traffic and 
always respected the independence of the churches. 



35 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Place of meeting of each session with names of Moderators, Clerks, and Preacher: 



YEAR 


CHURCH 


MODERATOR 


CLERK 


PREACHER 


1841 


Three Forks of S. F.. . . 


Isaiah Wilcoxon. . . . 


. . . Richard Gentry 


Barzilla McBride 


1842 


Beaver Creek 


Isaiah Wilcoxon. . . . 


. . . Richard Gentry 


Richard Gentry 


1843 


Roans Creek 


Barzilla McBride . . . 


. . . Richard Gentry 


Barzilla McBride 


1844 


South Fork 




. . . Richard Gentry 


R. P. Farthing 


1845 


Three Forks of N. F. . . 


Barzilla McBride . . . 


. . . Richard Gentry 


Richard Gentry 


1846 


Bear Creek 


Barzilla McBride . . . 


. . . Richard Gentry 


Joseph Harrison 


1847 




Barzilla McBride . . . 


. . . John Cook 


Barzilla McBride 


1848 


Three Forks of S. F.. . . 


Barzilla McBride . . . 


. . . Richard Gentry 


Richard Gentry 


1849 


North Fork 


Barzilla McBride . . . 


. . . Richard Gentry 


Barzilla McBride 


1850 


Gap Creek 


Barzilla McBride . . . 


. . . Richard Gentry 


Joseph Harrison 


1851 


Pine Grove 


Barzilla McBride . . . 


. . . John Cook 


Larkin Hodges 


1852 


Cove Creek 




. . . John Cook 


J. A. Farthing 


1853 


Horse Creek 


Barzilla McBride . . . 


. . . John Cook 


Jessie Farmer 


1854 


Old Fields 


. . J. A. Farthing 


. . . John Cook 


A. C. Farthing 


1855 




. . J. A. Farthing 


. . . John Cook 


Larking Hodges 


1856 




. . J. A. Farthing 


. . . John Cook 


J. A. Farthing 


1857 


Meat Camp 


. . J. A. Farthing 


. . . John Cook 


John Cook 


1858 




. . J. A. Farthing 


. . . John Cook 


Joseph Harrison 


1859 


Three Forks of N. F. . . 


. . J. A. Farthmg 


. . . John Cook 


Wm. Wilcoxon 


1860 


Bethel 


. . J. A. Farthing 


. . . John Cook 


D. C. Harmon 


1861 


Three Forks of S. F.. . . 


. . J. A. Farthing 


. . . Rufus Moore 


A. C. Farthing 


1862 


Gap Creek 


. . J. A. Farthing 


. . . Rufus Moore 


J. A. Farthing 


1863 






. . . Rufus Moore 


R. P. Farthing 


1864 


Cove Creek 


. . J. A. Farthing 


. . . Hiram McBride 


S. J. Farthing 


1865 


Mulberry 


. . J. A. r arthmg 


. . . Hiram McBride 


A. C I< arthmg 


1 O 


Meat Camp 


. . J. A. r arthmg 


. . . Hiram McBride 


U. C rlarmon 


1867 


Brushy Fork 


. . J. A. Farthing 


. . . Hiram McBride 


L. L. Maples 


1868 


Globe 


. . J. A. Farthing 


. . . Hiram McBride 


Jobe Moore 


1869 


Bethel 


. . J. A. Farthing 


. . . D. C. Harmon 


D. C. Harmon 


1870 


Three Forks 


. . J. A. Farthing 


. . . D. C. Harmon 


R. p. Farthmg 


1871 


Yadkin 


. . J. A. Farthing 


. . . D. C. Harmon 


A. C. Farthing 


1872 




. . J. A. Farthing 


... D. C. Harmon 


T. F. Nelson 


1873 


Meat Camp 


. . J. A. Farthing 


. . . D. C. Harmon 


A. C. Farthing 


1874 




. . J. A. Farthing 


. . . D. C. Harmon 


D. C. Harmon 


1875 


Mount Zion 


. . D. C. Harmon 


. . . L. L. Greene 


J. M. Hall 


1876 


Mount Pleasant 


. . D. C. Harmon 


. . . L. L. Greene 


J. A. Farthing 


1877 


Globe 




. . . L. L. Greene 


W. D. Brown 


1878 


Cove Creek 


. . A. C. Farthing 


. . . Hiram McBride 


Asa Brown 


1879 


South Fork 


. . A. C. Farthing 


. . . Hiram McBride 


D. C. Harmon 


1880 


Pisgah 


. . A. C. Farthing 


... D. C. Harmon 


E. F. Jones 


1881 


Brushy Fork 


. . A. C. Farthing 


. . . D. C. Harmon 


D. C. Harmon 


1882 


Flat Top 


. . A. C. Farthing 


. . . D. C. Harmon 


A. C. Farthing 


1883 


Mulberry 


. . A. C. Farthing 


. . . D. C. Harmon 


E. F. Jones 


1884 


Bethel 


. . A. C. Farthing 


... D. C. Harmon 


J. J. L. Sherwood 


1885 


Three Forks 


. . A. C. Farthing 


... D. C. Harmon 


I. W. Thomas 


1886 


Laurel Springs 


. . A. C. Farthing 


. . . J. J. T. Reese 


J. M. Harmon 


1887 


Beaver Dam 


. . A. C. Farthing 


. . . J. J. T. Reese 


T TT T71 lL. - ^ 

J. H. Farthmg 


1888 


Boone 


. . A. C. Farthing 


. . . J. J. T. Reese 


David Greene 


1889 


Mount Zion 


. . . A. C. Farthing 


. . . Jacob Younce 


jjr. c Ji. layior 


1890 


Three Forks 


. . . A. C. Farthing 


. . . Jacob Younce 


J. <j. Li. bnerwoou 


1891 


Mount Gilead 


. . . A. C. Farthing 


. . . Jacob Younce 


J. r . Uavis 


1 o o o 






. . . cldCOD lOUIlCc; 


J H Parthinff 


1893 


Antioch 


W. S. Farthing 


. . . Jacob Younce 


Dr. C. Durham 


1894 


Gap Creek 


. . . J. F. Spainhour .... 


. . . Jacob Younce 


L. A. Wilson 


1895 




W. S. Farthing 


. . . Jacob Younce 


J. E. Younce 


1896 


South Fork 


W. S. Farthing 


. . . Smith Hagaman 


J. H. Farthing 


1897 


Brushy Fork 


W. S. Farthing 


. . . Smith Hagaman 


David Greene 


1898 


Cool Springs ........ 


. . . W. S. Farthing 


. . . Smith Hagaman 


L. C. Wilson 


1899 


Beech Mountain 


. . . W. S. Farthing 


. . . Smith Hagaman 


L. C. Wilson 


1900 


Laurel Springs 


. . . J. A. Farthing 


. . . Smith Hagaman 


J. M. Payne 



36 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1940 
1941 
1942 
1943 
1944 
1945 
1946 
1947 
1948 
1949 

1950 

1951 

1952 

1953 

1954 

1955 

1956 

1957 



Bethel W. S. Farthing Smith Hagaman 

Flat Top W. S. Farthing Smith Hagaman 

Zion Hill W. S. Farthing Smith Hagaman 

Elk Valley W. S. Farthing Smith Hagaman 

Pleasant Grove W. S. Farthing Smith Hagaman 

Shulls Mills W. S. Farthing Smith Hagaman 

Boone W. S. Farthing Smith Hagaman 

Forest Qrove W. S. Farthing Smith Hagaman 

Howard's Creek W. S. Farthing Smith Hagaman 

Beaver Dam W. S. Farthing Smith Hagaman 

Mount Calvary W. S. Farthing Smith Hagaman 

South Fork J. J. L. Sherwood Smith Hagaman 

Cove Creek J. J. L. Sherwood Smith Hagaman 

Meat Camp J. J. L. Sherwood Smith Hagaman 

Zionville J. J. L. Sherwood W. Y. Perry . 

Stony Fork J. J. L. Sherwood W. Y. Perry . 

Antioch J. J. L. Sherwood W.Y.Perry . 

Bethel Smith Hagaman W. Y. Perry . 

Union Smith Hagaman W. Y. Perry . 

Gap Creek Smith Hagaman W. Y. Perry . 

Brushy Fork Smith Hagaman W.Y.Perry . 

Timbered Ridge Smith Hagaman W. Y. Perry . 

Laurel Springs Smith Hagaman W. Y. Perry . 

Pleasant Grove Smith Hagaman W. Y. Perry . 

Three Forks Smith Hagaman W. Y. Perry . 

South Fork Smith Hagaman W. Y. Perry . 

Zion Hill Smith Hagaman W. Y. Perry . 

Middle Fork I. G. Greer W. Y. Perry . 

Shulls Mills I. G. Greer W. Y. Perry . 

Mount Lebanon L g. Greer W. Y. Perry . 

Meat Camp L G. Greer W. Y. Perry . 

Bethany L G. Greer W. Y. Perry . 

South Fork W. D. Farthing W. Y. Perry . 

Beaver Dam W. D. Farthing Dean Swift. . 

Brushy Fork W. D. Farthing Clyde R. Greene 

Zionville R. C. Eggers Clyde R. Greene 

Howard's Creek R. C. Eggers Clyde R. Greene 

Oak Grove R. C. Eggers Clyde R. Greene 

Cove Creek R. C. Eggers Clyde R. Greene 

Three Forks R. C. Eggers Clyde R. Greene 

Pleasant Grove S. C. Eggers Clyde R. Greene 

Mount Calvary S. C. Eggers Clyde R. Greene 

Clark's Creek S. C. Eggers Clyde R. Greene 

Bethel S. C. Eggers Clyde R. Greene 

Boone J. C. Canipe Clyde R. Greene 



H. K. Middleton Clyde R. Greene 

H. K. Middleton Clyde R. Greene 

R. C. Eggers Clyde R 

R. C. Eggers Clyde R 



Greene 
Greene 



Rutherwood 

Willowdale 

Laurel Springs 

Zionville 

Forest Grove 

Perkinsville R. C. Eggers Clyde R. Greene 

Three Forks 

Beech Valley R. C. Eggers Clyde R. Greene 

Poplar Grove 

Mabel R. C. Eggers Clyde R. Greene 

Union 

South Fork R. C. Eggers Clyde R. Greene 

Green Valley 

Oak Grove L. H. Hollingsworth . 

Boone 

Bethany L. H. Hollingsworth . 

Mount Calvary 

Pleasant Grove CO. Vance Mrs. Blanche Perry 

Bethel L. H. Hollingsworth 

Cove Creek Wade E. Brown Mrs. Blanche Perry 

Gap Creek 



Mrs. Blanche Perry 
Mrs. Blanche Perry 



D. C. Harmon 
Solomon Younce 
J. F. Miller 
C. S. Farthing 
David Greene 
C. S. Farthing 

C. S. Farthing 
J. M. Payne 

D. A. Greene 
J. M. Payne 
G. W. Trivette 

J. J. L. Sherwood 
J. F. Eller 
J. M. Payne 
L. A. Wilson 
J. F. Eller 
L. C. Wilson 
Wellington Swift 
R. C. Eggers 
R. C. Eggers 
F. M. Huggins 
L. C. Wilson 
R. C. Eggers 
Roy Dotson 

F. M. Huggins 

E. J. Farthing 
Braxton Craig 
L. A. Hurst 

P. A. Hicks 
A. J. Greene 
Roy Dtoson 
J. A. McKaughan 
W. D. Ashley 
A. J. Greene 
W. R. Davis 
J. C. Canipe 
W. C. Payne 
Phillip Fletcher 

D. M. Edmisten 

G. A. Hamby 
J. C. Canipe 

H. K. Middleton 
Vilas Minton 
Raymond Hendrix 
Ben Lee Ray 

L. H. Hagaman 
W. De. Ashley 
Oscar J. Harris 
Ronda Earp 

Raymond Hendrix 

A. C. Moody 

Harold Songer 

Victor Trivette 

E. O. Gore 
CO. Vance 
R. C Eggers 
Rex W. West 



37 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



1958 Poplar Grove Wade E. Brown Mrs. Blanche Perry J. E. Crump 

Stony Fork 

1959 Union Rex W. West Mrs. Blanche Perry W. R. Eaton 

Rutherwood J. Hoyt Roberson 

1960 Meat Camp Rex W. West Mrs. Blanche Perry E. M. Blankenship 

Willowdale Bernard Tuttle 

1961 Willow Valley E. M. Blankenship Mrs. Blanche Perry Glenn South 

Middle Fork W. T. Brackett 

1962 Pleasant Grove E. M. Blackenship Mrs. Alma Phillips J. Boyce Brooks 

Howard's Creek Herbert McCoy 

1963 South Fork Co. O. Vance Mrs. Alma Phillips George Hyler 

Oak Grove Maurice Cooper 

1964 Greenway CO. Vance Miss Harriet Gentry J. E. Crump 

Zionville Walter Hill 

1965 Brushy Fork J. O. Young Mrs. Alma Phillips J. C. Canipe 

Boone W. E. Pope 

1966 Laurel Springs J. E. Crump Mrs. Alma Phillips L. A. Talbert 

Poplar Grove Donald Wilson 

1967 Perkinsville J. E. Crump Mrs. Alma Phillips E.S.Morgan 

Cove Creek Russell Richardson 

1968 Rutherwood Clyde R. Greene Mrs. Alma Phillips Fritz Hemphill 

Beech Valley Marvin Saunders 

1969 Blowing Rock Clyde R. Greene Mrs. Blanche Perry Pete Vannoy 

Mount Calvary H. E. Benfield 

1970 Three Forks Herbert McCoy Mrs. Blanche Perry Fritz Hemphill 

Oak Grove Lynn Powers 

1971 Boone, First Dr. Jack Lawrence Mrs. Blanche Perry James Mull 

Tabernacle R. T. Stancil 

1972 Pleasant Grove Dr. Jack Lawrence Mrs. Kathy Adams Co. O. Vance 

Greenway Miss Lois Blackburn Howard Cook 

1973 Brushy Fork Vance Edwards Miss Lois Blackburn Robert Mann 

Bethel Guy Hunt, Jr. 

1974 Cove Creek James Marsh, Sr Mrs. Blanche Perry Harold King 

Meat Camp Robert R. White 

1975 Rutherwood James Marsh, Sr Mrs. Blanche Perry Fred Reece 

Gap Creek Charles Allard 

1976 Perkinsville James Marsh, Sr Mrs. Blanche Perry Dr. Robert Newton 

Brushy Fork James Lambert 



38 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



MINUTES OF THE THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
September 1-2, 1865 
(As copied from the original hand-written copy.) 



Minutes of the Three Forks Baptist Association at its 
twenty -fifth annual session held with the Mulberry Church, 
Caldwell County, North Carolina September 1st and 2nd 
days, 1865. 

The introductory sermon was delivered by Elder 
Stephen J. Farthing from Colossians 2nd chapter and 6th 
verse. After a short recess the delegates assembled at the 
house after prayer by Elder R. P. Farthing. Read letters 
from eleven churches and one church represented without 
a letter from which the annual table was prepared. 

1st. The association was organized by electing John 
A. Farthing moderator and Hiram McBride clerk. 

2nd. Invited transient members to seats with us. Elder 
R. H. Moody from Catawba and Stephen J. Farthing from 
Three Forks accepted the same and took part in our 
deliberations. 

3rd. Invited corresponding Brethren from sister 
associations to seats. Elders Reason Jones and T. B. Welch 
from Senter came forward with a letter and parcel of min- 
utes and Elder Wm. B. Halsey and Daniel Cawdell from 
Mountain with a letter who received the right hand of fel- 
lowship and seated with us. 

4th. Appointed Brethren Wm. Hayes, F. Danner and 
Benjamin Green with the delegates of this church to arrange 
the ministry during this association and appointed for 
tomorrow 1st Wm. B. Halsey, 2nd T. B. Welch, 3rd Daniel 
Cawdell, 4th A. C. Farthing. 

5th. Appointed Elder D. C. Harmon, A. C. Farthing 
and Job Moore with the moderator and clerk a committee 
to arrange the business of this association and correspond- 
ents invited to act with them. 

6th. Appointed Brethren John L. Adams, Jacob Lewis 
and Benjamin Green committee on finance. 

7th. After prayer adjourned until tomorrow morn- 
ing 10 o'clock. 

Saturday morning September 2nd the association met 
according to adjournment, and after prayer by Elder D. 
Cawdell proceeded. 

1st. The committee of arrangements report which 
was received and the committee discharged. 

2nd. Called on correspondents to Sister associations 
who reported satisfactory. 

3rd. On motion appointed Brethren Robert Shearer, 
F. Danner and Wm. Hayes a committee on correspondence 
and union meetings. 

4th. On motion read the Constitution and Rules of 
Decorum. 

5th. Took up the reference of the New Covenant 
Church from last year and after some investigation agree 
to pass the matter for the present. 

6th. Took up the case of the South Fork, Zion and 
Laurel Fork churches for not representing themselves in 
our body and appointed the following committees to visit 
them. 1st to South Fork, Elder R. P. Farthing and Breth- 
ren EH Brown and Benjamin Green. 2nd Zion, Elder A. 
C. Farthing and Brethren R. Shearer and Ransom Hayes. 
3rd Laurel Fork, Elders Job Moore, D. C. Harmon, and Bro- 
ther Hiram McBride. 

7th. The committee on ministry report for tomor- 



row. 1st D. Cawdell, 2nd R. H. Moody, 3rd Reason Jones, 
4th J. A. Farthing. 

8th. Took up the request of the Bethlehem Church 
and finding that there existed a difficulty between that 
church and the Globe Church declined to grant their re- 
quest for the present, and appointed a committee consisting 
of the following Ministering Brethren viz. D. C. Harmon, 
A. C. Farthing, R. P. Farthing and John A. Farthing, and 
Brethren R. Shearer and Benjamin Green to inquire into 
and settle the matter if possible and report to the next 
cissociation. 

9th. Committee on finance reported and was dis- 
charged. Report: Received in contributions from the 
churches in Bank notes sixteen dollars and twenty-five 
cents, in specie two dollars and fifty cents, in Greenback 
five dollars and forty cents. 

10th. Committee on correspondence and union meet- 
ings report the following: 1st to Roaring River, Elders 
R. P. and S. J. Farthing, to Senter, Elders A. C. Farthing 
and Job Moore, to Mountain, Elders D. C. Harmon and 
John A. Farthing to write letters and assign the moderator's 
and clerk's names. 2nd appointed union meetings as fol- 
lows: with the Three Fork of South Fork to commence on 
Friday before the first Sabbath in June next, Elders A. C. 
and R. P. Farthing and Job Moore to attend one with Three 
Fork of North Fork to commence on Friday before the 
third Sabbath in May next, S. J. Farthing, D. C. Harmon 
and John A. Farthing to attend. 

11th. On motion allowed the clerk five dollars in 
Bank notes, two dollars and thirty cents in specie and five 
dollars and forty cents in Greenback for writing out a copy 
of our minutes for each church. 

12th. Appointed our next association to be held with 
the Meat Camp Church, Watauga County, North Carolina, 
six miles north of Boone, to commence on Friday before 
the first Sabbath in September 1866 and appointed Elder 
A. C. Farthing to preach the introductory sermon. Elder 
D. C. Harmon his alternate. 

13th. Resolved that we tender our thanks to the citiz- 
zens of this vicinity for their kindness and hospitality mani- 
fested toward us during our meeting. Prayer by Elder R. 
H. Moody and adjourned to time and place of our next 
association. 

14th. The stand was filled on Sunday by Brethren 
in order of their names to a large congregation. 



39 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 





STATISTICAL TABLE 




LETTER 


' LETTER 








CO 

iz; 


CHURCHES 


DELEGATES NAMES 




> 


« 








o 




'TIZED 


RESTORED 


RECEIVED 


MISSED 


:luded 


Q 

< 


<. 


JTRIBUI 




< 


73 

3 


X 

w 


Q 


E-i 
O 
H 


O 


Antiocn 


D. C. Harmon 














3.40 


Betnei 


J. A., A. C. and R. P. Farthing 








5 




DO 


4.00 


rsetnlenem 


W. Moore, A. and B. C. Harrison 








2 


i 




.75 


Brushy Fork 


F. Danner, W. Holtsclaw 1 






1 


2 




00 


5.00 


Buck Mountain 


Samuel Hicks, M. W. Winters 




9 




4 








Cove Creek 


John L. Adams 








3 


1 


OU 


4.00 


ulobe 


Job Moore, James Estes 1 


1 








o 
Z 


Z4 




Meat Camp 


Benjamin Green 




1 




4 


1 


61 


1.20 


Mulberry 


C. Blair, Hugh Green 












20 




Pine Grove 


Wm. Hayes, Hiram McBride 












23 


1.00 


inree rorKs oi 


















ooutn rorK 


R. Shearer, E. Brown, R. Hays 








3 




1 hp; 

iUO 


2.25 


Inree rorKs oi 


















JNortn rork 


J. Roark, J. Lewis 




2 


2 


3 


o 


bo 


2.00 


Ebenezer 


Not Represented 
















Gap Creek 


Not Represented 
















Laurel Fork 


Not Represented 
















New Covenant 


Not Represented 
















Roans Creek 


Not Represented 
















South Fork 


Not Represented 
















Watauga 


Not Represented 
















Zion 


Not Represented 


















TOTALS 2 


1 


5 


3 


26 


11 


511 


23.95 



40 



Three Forks Baptist Association 



TABLES 



Year ending June 30, 1976 



41 



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'1 




Three Forks Baptist Association 



CHURCHES 



Year ending June 30, 1976 



All photographs of the churches as they are today donated by 

DUANE THOMAS' PHOTOGRAPHIC SERVICE 
P. O. Box 108 
Boone, North Carolina 
Phone 264-8355 



59 



ANTIOCH BAPTIST CHURCH 





Antioch Baptist Church was constituted in 1849 
in a log school house on Watauga River. Since the 
early records of the church were lost by fire not 
too much is known about the early life of the 
church. According to the records of Cove Creek 
Church a group in the Hix settlement petitioned 
that church for permission to organize a new 
church and Antioch Church was organized August 
18, 1849 with 11 charter members from Cove 
Creek. 

J. A. Farthing was probably the first pastor 
since the records of Cove Creek Church state that 
Antioch Church requested them to consider or- 
daining Mr. Farthing to preach the gospel because 
they (Antioch) needed his services, and the request 
was complied with. 



It is thought that D. C. Harmon was the first 
clerk. L. W. Farthing, E. M. Greer and L. D. Ward 
were the first deacons whose ncimes are on record. 

Early in the history of the church the following 
men were ordained to the ministry: D. C. HEurnon, 
J. M. Presnell, A. J. Harmon. Later J. M. Harman, 
L. W. Farthing and W. H. Glenn. 

Antioch Church joined the Three Forks Baptist 
Association soon after the church was constituted 
and the Association has met with the church four 
times. A Sunday School was organized at an early 
date and for many years only met during the best 
months of the year but for many years has met 
every month. 

Rev. Carl Wilson is the present pastor. 



61 



BEAVER DAM BAPTIST CHURCH 




Beaver Dam Baptist Church was constituted by 
J. A. Farthing and D. B. Brown on the 7th day of 
November 1874. There were 23 charter members, 
11 from Bethel Church, 8 from Cove Creek Church 
and 4 from Mt. Zion Church. 

Two pastors were elected to preach for the 
church, J. A. Farthing and D. B. Brown, who 
served for 4 years. 

The church has ordained 5 of its members to 
preach, namely: Jacob Hagaman, J. C. Johnson, 
Wagner A. Reese, Carl Wilson and Vaughn Greene. 

In 1974 the church celebrated her Centennial, 
one hundred years of continuous worship and 
growth. The day was enjoyed by many members 
and friends of the church who participated in the 
preaching, singing and a bountiful lunch. 



62 



BEECH VALLEY BAPTIST CHURCH 




Beech Valley Baptist Church was constituted 
in 1941 by Rev. J. C. Canipe. People felt the need 
for a more centrally located place of worship in 
the community. The dwelling house and lot pic- 
tured above, were bought from Fred Dickens by 
Smith and George Harmon. A revival was held 
here by Rev. J. C. Canipe. Many souls were saved 
and a church was organized. Mr. Smith Harmon 
gave additional land for a new church building. 
By sacrificial efforts and interest of the people 
the building was finished in 1942 and dedicated 
in 1946. Pastors have been the Reverends Dwight 
Edmisten, Lawrence Hagaman, Ed Farthing, Will 
Cook, James Allen, Barney Oliver, Herring Crisp, 
Vaughn Greene, W. C. Payne, Linzy Hicks, Clyde 
Comett, Gene Sherwood, Frank Womack and Max 



West. We are grateful to all who have served this 
church in various ways, and most of all we praise 
the Lord for souls who have been saved and His 
many blessings on us. 




63 



BETHEL BAPTIST CHURCH 







On July 4, 1851, ten members of the Cove 
Creek Church, having been released for the pur- 
pose, were constituted into Bethel Baptist Church. 
These charter members were: A. C. Farthing, M. N. 
Farthing, Rachel W. Farthing, Anne Farthing, 
W. B. Farthing, Anne W. Farthing, Stephen J. Far- 
thing, Margaret Farthing, Nancy Johnson and 
Madison Johnson. At the new church's first meet- 
ing it requested to be admitted as a member of 
the Three Forks Association. 

The church enrollment increased consistently, 
and during the next 20 years 184 members joined 
in the fellowship of the church, including a num- 
ber of slaves. By the year 1892, the total member- 
ship had risen to approximately 325; in 1900, 485 
and by 1930, 800 members had united with the 
church. The active membership in 1930 was 244. 
There have been three buildings erected for wor- 



ship. The first was built soon after the church was 
constituted, the second in 1871 at a cost of 
$290.07 and the present building in 1924 at a cost 
of $8,000.00. 

Bethel has been the parent church for three 
churches: Beaver Dam 1874, Timbered Ridge 
1906, Mountain Dale 1941 (the majority of these 
charter members coming from Bethel and Beaver 
Dam). In September 1975, a portion of the mem- 
bership, wishing to disassociate with the Three 
Forks Association and Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion, withdrew and formed Calvary Baptist Church. 

Bethel Church has ordained six ministers: A. C. 
Farthing, S. J. Farthing, J. H. Farthing, C. S. Far- 
thing, L. C. Farthing and E. J. Farthing. 

On September 21, 1975 the church voted 
unanimously to call Dr. R. Paul Caudill, the 
present pastor. 



64 



BETHEL BAPTIST CHURCH 




From Minutes of Three Forks Baptist Association 



BEECH MOUNTAIN BAPTIST CHURCH 
August 29-31, 1899 
Report On Home Missions 

By Home Missions is meant the work of the Southern 
Baptist Convention in all the Southern States, Okla- 
homa, Indian Territory, New Mexico and Cuba. 

The way has been opened for the Gospel in all these 
places, and if the Baptists do not occupy them and 
furnish the Bible and a pure Gospel to a waiting people. 
Advantage will be taken by teachers of error and the 
destitute places will be filled with false doctrines. 

The unusual activity of the Mormons in these mount- 
ains and rural districts adds special emphaisis to the call 
for help from these sections. Hundreds of Mormon 
missionaries are already at work in Tennessee, North 
Carolina and other parts of the South, and we cannot 
delay enlarged systematic and well planned work. 
Other errrors are being taught equally deceptive and 
soul-ruining as Mormonism. We need to be more liberal 
in the means which God has given us in supporting 
the Gospel in all these sections. 

N. J. Phillips, C. L. Farthing, Committee 



HOWARD'S CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 
August 24-26, 1909 
Report On Periodicals 

The subject of literature is a very important one. 
The kind of reading matter which enters our homes 
has a great deal to do with shaping the lives and charact- 
ers of our children. Impure, unwholesome literature 
will leave its mark on its readers, and perhaps lead 
them to engage in robbery, murder or other crimes, 
while good religious literature will lead in the opposite 
direction. John Bunyan had access to only two books 
in his youth, but they were good ones and led the right 
way. 

Among the many periodicals which your committee 
would recommend are, the Biblical Recorder, Charity 
and Children, Foreign Mission Journal and Home Field, 
also the publications of the Sunday School Board of 
Nashville, Tennessee. These are good and wholesome 
reading, and every Baptist home should be supplied 
with as many of them as you may be able to take. 

Wm. Elrod, J. F. Davis, Comm. 



65 



BETHANY BAPTIST CHURCH 





Bethany Baptist Church was organized June 11, 
1893, in a school house near the present church by 
Jacob Younce, John Crisp, I. J. McGinnis and A. J. 
Harmon with 7 charter members: W. J. Farthing, 
John Walker, Mary Walker, Alice Baird, Nancy 
Mitchell, Miles Benfield and Ida Benfield. At the 
same meeting the church was named and the Arti- 
cles of Faith were adopted. 

On July 15, 1893 the first pastor, A. J. Harmon 



and the first clerk, W. J. Farthing, were elected. 
W. J. Farthing and M. J. Benfield were ordained 
the first deacons on August 19, 1893. 

The church met in the Cool Springs School 
House until the close of the year 1893 when the 
present church building was completed. In later 
years the building was enlarged and improved. 
The church is at present without a pastor. 



Whereas the churches of this Association have gone 
through the trials of another year, we beheve from 
the best information we can get that progress has been 
made. 

As far as we can observe the B. Y. P. U. Work is 
making fine progress in the Association. 

We are sorry to report that our churches are making 
little or no progress along the line of Church Discipline. 

Webgelieve that some of our churches would make 
greater progress if the pastors serving them would serve 
only three or four churches each, and not try to serve 
six or eight, which will kill any pastor and starve to 



BEAVER DAM BAPTIST CHURCH 

August 28-29, 1934 
Associational Progress 

death any set of churches. 

Your Committee would recommend the following: 
(1) That we urge our pastors to attend the Pastors' 
Conferences and Fifth Sunday meetings more as these 
greatly strengthen and help. (2) That we urge our 
pastors not to serve more than four or five churches 
each. (30 That we give more encouragement to the 
B. Y. P. U. and W. M. U. and the Sunday School work. 
(4) We believe our churches would make greater progress 
and take on greater life if our pastors and deacons 
and Sunday School teachers would preach and teach 
the Bible more on the subject of Christian giving. 

R. C. Eggers 



66 



BLOWING ROCK BAPTIST CHURCH 




The First Baptist Church was constituted 
July 11, 1903, with twelve members. The first 
congregation met in the school near Mayview 
L£ike. One charter member remains, Mrs. Sallie 
Hodges. Our first church home was erected on 
Main Street in 1905. At that time, the First Bap- 
tist, Boone and Cove Creek constituted a church 
field with our church. In 1913 the Woman's 
Missionary Union was organized with Mrs. Rose 
Garvey president. In 1924 a new building was 
erected and still stands as a reminder of more than 
40 years of worship and service. 

Rev. Ben Lee Ray, the first full-time pastor, was 
called in 1941 and the next year a peirsonage was 
purchased. During the '60's the influx of summer 
friends reached flood-tide and the congregation 
was faced with the challenge of providing a church 
home adequate to the increased attendance as well 
as its own growth. In 1962, under the leadership 
of Rev. George Hyler, a building committee was 
formed, necessary plans were made and construc- 
tion began in 1967. April 7, 1968 the first wor- 
ship service was held in the Broyhill Chapel of the 
new building. The church's capacity includes a 
Sanctuary seating 360; a Chapel seating 160 and 
an Educational faculity providing for 200 in at- 



tendance. 

In September 1973 our present pastor, Dr. 
Robert L. Newton, was called to the ministry of 
the church. Church renewal and innovative pro- 
grams to meet the growing needs of the church are 
the focus at present. Our children and youth 
groups continue to grow. The steady influx of 
year-round residents present us with added oppor- 
tunities. As this church looks ahead we can say 
with the Psalmist "Our lives have fallen in pleasant 
places; yea, we have a goodly heritage." 

- » ' ' / ^ ^ -t, ^ . 




67 



FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF BOONE 




On the first day of September 1871 the Boone 
Baptist Church was accepted as a member of the 
Three Forks Association. Prior to that date six 
members of the Meat Camp Baptist Church, two 
members of the South Fork Baptist Church, and 
two members of the Brushy Fork Baptist Church, 
with seven other Baptists, had met in the 
Watauga County Courthouse and completed the 
church organization. The co-pastors of the new 
church were William Baldwin and J. W. Hall. Dur- 
ing the one hundred five years since that time the 
church has grown from 17 members to 1200 mem- 
bers and provided a nucleus of 95 members for the 
Green way Baptist Church. 

The first building owned and occupied by the 
church stood on the present Rivers Street and was 
used until 1915, when a new building was erected 
at the comer of King Street and College Street. 
A Sunday School building was completed and oc- 
cupied in 1929. Both Sunday School and Preach- 
ing services were held in this building until the 
present sanctuary was built in 1935. From 1960 
to 1965 the church was engaged in a construction 
and remodelling program which culminated in the 
present structure. 

The church now employs a staff of nine persons 



who seek to enable the congregation to realize its 
goal of being a "servant-church," reaching out to 
the entire community through the teaching of the 
Bible, faithful preaching of the Good News, and 
active social involvement in ministering to this 
community. In fulfilling our world-wide mission, 
we cooperate with the Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion and the North Carolina Baptist State Conven- 
cont'd on page 70 



if 




68 



BRUSHY FORK BAPTIST CHURCH 





Brushy Fork Baptist Church was constituted 
February 26, 1858 by Joseph Harrison and D. C. 
Harmon in a small schoolhouse about one mile 
from the present building with 11 charter mem- 
bers. 

The church was first called Philadelphia, but 
after 3 months it was changed to Brushy Fork. 
The first building was of logs and erected in 1860. 
In 1889 another building was completed and dur- 
ing the 1930's 5 Sunday School rooms were added. 
The present building was constructed in 1949 and 
the educational plant added in the 1960's. The 
parsonage was built in 1956 with additions made 
later. 

Major improvements to the present church 
building have been made from time to time and in 
1972, 20 acres of additional land was purchased 
which is a great asset. In 1975 a sound system was 
installed with equipment for taping the services. 
These tapes are taken to those unable to attend 
church. Also, during 1975 plans were made for the 
construction of a fellowship hall and additional 
Sunday School rooms which is now under con- 
struction and will be completed soon. 

God has blessed Brushy Fork not only with 
material blessings but with spiritual blessings 



too. Through the leadership of some of our good 
pastors, the church has ordained two fine preach- 
ers, Ray Minton and Cannon Ward. Richard 
Baird has been licensed and is now preparing 
himself for full time Christian service. 

The church has increased in membership from 
the 11 charter members to the present number 
of 320 resident members. 

D. C. Harmon was the first pastor and served 
24 years. The church is at present without a pas- 
cont'd on page 70 




69 



CLARK'S CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 




Clark's Creek Baptist Church was organized on 
October 22, 1898, with Rev. C. S. Farthing being 
elected the first pastor. The church was organized 
with 20 charter members. In the 78 year history 
of Clark's Creek Baptist Church there have been 
two buildings, the present building having been 
constructed in 1941. Currently the membership 
is 112 and the pastor is Rev. Billy G. Warren. 



FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF BOONE 
cont'd from page 68 

tion in all their sponsored programs and activities. 

A total of 21 pastors have served the church. 
They are listed in order of their first pastorates: 
William Baldwin, J. W. Hall, D. C. Harmon, T. F. 
Nelson, I. W. Thomas, E. F. Jones, J. H. Yarboro, 
J. F. Davis, L. C. Wilson, J. J. L. Sherwood, J. H. 
Farthing, J. M. Payne, M. A. Adams, R. D. Cross, 
F. M. Huggins, P. A. Hicks, J. C. Canipe, W. G. 
Bond, L. H. HoUingsworth, J. Boyce Brooks, 
Robert C. Mann. 



BRUSHY FORK BAPTIST 
cont'd from page 69 

tor but we are praying that God will continue to 
bless us and will soon give us an Under-Shepherd 
who will lead us further in a greater way for the 
glory of God. 



70 




COOL SPRINGS BAPTIST CHURCH 





Cool Springs Baptist Church was organized 
July 30, 1887 by the following presbytery: John 
Crisp, I. J. McGinnis, and R. K. Hartley, clerk, in 
a small school house. The charter members were: 
W. F. Knight, Martha Knight, J. M. Payne, Mrs. 
E. J. Payne, J. M. Hartley, Mrs. E. M. Hartley, 
T. M. Cannon, Louisa Cannon, J. C. Coffey, Mrs. 
M. E. Coffey and Emily Hartley. 

They worshipped in the schoolhouse until 1889 



when the first church building was erected. The 
second building was erected in 1909 and the pres- 
ent day brick structure in 1943. 

L J. McGinnis was the first pastor and T. M. 
Cannon the first clerk. J. M. Payne and W. C. 
Payne were ordained by the church to the gospel 
ministry. 

The present pastor is Rev. David Greene and 
the membership, 112. 



From Minutes of Three Forks Baptist Association 

LAUREL SPRINGS BAPTIST CHURCH 

August 28, 1923 
Duties Of Pastors To Their Churches 



The duties of pastors to their churches as well as 
their responsibilities seem to be greater than in any 
previous age. 

It is the duty of the pastor to study the condition 
of his church or churches, and to know their spiritual 
needs and then to prepare such discourses as are suit- 
able for them. 

It is his duty to preach the word in the church and 
out of the church, both public and private, in the home 
and our of it. The pastor should lead the flock out 
into green pastures: this is done by rightly dividing 
the Word of Truth and instructing them in the various 



activities of the work. The pastor should visit the sick, 
bury the dead, visit the homes of the people, preach 
by example as well as precept and thus be worthy of 
the vocation wherewith he is called. It is his duty to 
read our religious periodicals and keep himself informed 
as to the activities of the denomination. He should not 
lord it over his flock or act as a pope. It is not his duty 
to discourage the Mission cause as is sometimes done. 
The pastor should lead, but if he will not do so it would 
be a fine thing for him to go to the rear before his 
people say go there. 

R. C. Eggers. L. A. Wilson 



71 



COVE CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 




Cove Creek Baptist Church is the second old- 
est church established west of the Blue Ridge, 
having been constituted from the Three Forks 
Baptist Church September 13, 1799. 

In the early years it was the custom of the 
church to have as many as three pastors at the 
same time who were called to serve the church as 
often as they could without remuneration. Samuel 
Vanderpool, Samuel Pittman and Abraham Linvil 
were the first pastors. 

The first religious services were held in the 
homes. The first building, made of logs, was built 
in 1805. Since that time the church has gone 
through five stages of development from the first 
log structure to the present well-equipped build- 
ing and pastor's home. 

An important event in the history of the church 
is the beginning of Sunday School in 1867 and so 
far as is known, the first in the Three Forks 
Association. 

Ten churches have been constituted from Cove 
Creek, thirteen men have been ordained into the 
Gospel Ministry, two have been licensed and two. 



a husband and wife, have been sent out as mission- 
aries to Chile. 

The church has now in its organization a Sunday 
School, Church Training, Woman's Missionary 
Union, Brotherhood and Music Ministry. 

J. R. Bouldin is the present pastor. 




72 



Elk Knob Baptist Church was organized in 1890. 
It has always been a small church in membership 
and Sunday School enrollment but has met a real 
need in the community where it serves. From this 
church has gone out leaders in many other 
churches in the Three Forks Association. 



From Minutes of Three Forks Baptist Association 

BEECH MOUNTAIN BAPTIST CHURCH 
August 29-3 1 , 1 899 
Report Of Associational Missionary 

The following is a list of the work done on the field 
and amount collected and paid over by the committee 
appointed last y ear: Miles traveled - 275 i Baptized - 7\ 
Sermons preached - 31; Churches organized - 1 (Clark's 
Creek); New Sunday Schools organized - 1; Received - 
$18.64. Paid to the Building Committee of Clark's 
Creek Church - $19.14. 

C. S. Farthing, Missionary 



FOREST GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 





Forest Grove Baptist Church was organized 
April 20, 1889 by J. H. Farthing and A. C. Far- 
thing with J. J. T. Reece as clerk of the presby- 
tery. Smith Hagaman was elected the first clerk 
and J. H. Farthing the first pastor. The third 
Saturday and Sunday of each month was adopted 
for the meeting time. There were 33 charter mem- 
bers coming from Bethel and Beaver Dam Churches. 

Forest Grove Church was one of the first in the 
Association to organize a Baptist Young People's 
Union — B. Y. P. U. — (Now Church Training) and 
a Woman's Missionary Union — W. M. U.: The 
W. M. U. in 1917 and the B. Y. P. U. in 1918. 



74 



FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH 






4^ '» ■ 



Friendship Baptist Church was organized in 
1948. Victor Trivette was the first pastor, C. C. 
Main, Sunday School Superintendent, and Glenn 
May, clerk. The first report to the Three Forks 
Baptist Association in 1949 showed a member- 
ship of 60 and 63 enrolled in Sunday School 



with an average attendance of 46. 

Pastors who have served the church in addition 
to the first pastor are: L. H. Hagaman, S. S. Gray- 
beal, E. O. Gore, W. A. Greer, Clyde Comett, 
Boyd Hall, Ray Greene and the present pastor, 
Maurice Ward. 



From Minutes of Three Forks Baptist Association 

LAUREL SPRINGS BAPTIST CHURCH 
August 29, 1923 



Baptist Young 

The past year has been very successful for the B. 
Y. P. U. work throughout the state. There are two 
wholetime workers in charge, Perry Morgan and Miss 
Elma Farabow, and they are doing fine work. While 
the work is moving forward in the state, it is most 
unfortunate for us that there are only three Unions in 
our Association. 

There are perhaps a number of reasons for this 
backward state of affairs: (1) The B. Y. P. U. is new 
and untried in this Association and we are not inclined 
to try a thing the first time. (2) There is a lack of 
information as to the nature and purpose of the Union. 
(3) There is a spirit of indifference among some of 



People's Union 

our pastors. (4) There is lack of encouragement on 
the part of church members. (5) No concerted effort 
has been made to get the work before the people and 
organize new Unions. 

Our deepest concern now is for the future spirit- 
uality and efficiency of our churches. If we diligently 
conserve and develop the possibilities wrapped up in 
the youth of our churches, the time will soon come 
when we will have a trained church membership that 
will completely and effectively revolutionize the same. 
Let us strive to conserve, harness and develop the 
powerful mines and resources lying dormant in the 
hearts and lives of our fine young people. 

George R. Sherrill, Committee 



75 



GAP CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 



I, 
/ 




Gap Creek Baptist Church was constituted with 
about twelve charter members in Ashe County and 
became a member of the Three Forks Association 
in August 1842. 

Sometime later the church erected a one room 
building in Watauga County, just across the line 
from Ashe County. This building served the con- 
gregation until 1939 when four Sunday School 
rooms were added. This made the building ade- 
quate for the membership of 134. 

In 1952 a larger and more modern building was 
erected a short distance from the old church site. 
This was of brick veneer with nine Sunday School 
rooms, modem conveniences and a baptistry. In 
1974 a seven room pastorium was constructed 
which is occupied by the present pastor. In 1974 
thirty -one members left the church leaving the 
membership at 153. The present pastor is Rev. 
Lester Carson. The tenth session of the Three 
Forks Baptist Association was held with the Gap 
Creek Church August 23-24, 1850. It also met 
there in 1862, 1894, 1920, 1957 and 1975. 




76 



GREEN VALLEY BAPTIST CHURCH 




When Green Valley Baptist Church was organ- 
ized it met a definite need of many people in that 
particular section of Watauga County who were 
not in close touch with any church. 

Under the leadership of N. M. Greene, who be- 
came the first pastor, the church became a reality 
in 1946. The first report to the Three Forks 
Baptist Association showed a membership of 30. 
The last report several years later showed 124. 
The Association held one day of its Annual Meet- 
ing with the church in 1953. 




77 



GREENWAY BAPTIST CHURCH 




In 1951 Dr. W. G. Bond and a few members of 
First Baptist Church, Boone, became interested 
in a Baptist mission for Boone's southside. On 
Friday June 22, 1951 Pastor Bond and some inter- 
ested members met to repair and clean an unused 
service station on the old Blowing Rock road. 
Sunday June 24, 1951 the first service was held. 
First Church provided seats and a pump organ. 
August 1951 Martha Quails conducted a Vacation 
Bible School with 35 enrolled. Midweek prayer 
services were conducted in homes until electricity 
was installed. Sunday classes were held in build- 
ing, under trees and in cars. First revival was in 
September 1952 with Lloyd Cullers. July 1953 
Eber Hudson came for services. BSU students 
supplied for several services with John Davis, 
leader, until Howard Barnes became pastor. Sun- 
day School attendance averaged from 25 to 50. 
Several pastors served short-term service. W. R. 
Eaton was elected to serve beginning January 6, 
1956. January 29th the Mission was dedicated in 
the new building. First Sunday February 1956, 
morning and evening services and Training Union 
were begun. WMU was organized May 1, 1956. 
The only wedding performed in the Mission was 
Joyce Shores and Gene Rayfield. July 6, 1958 



Boone Baptist Mission was constituted as Green- 
way Baptist Church with 98 charter members 
with 1,000 people present. W. R. Eaton was 
elected Pastor and served 3 years. C. O. Vance 
was called and began his pastorate December 1, 
1961. Church parsonage was constructed in 1961 
and dedicated in July 1962. Another great day 
was Homecoming and Groundbreaking July 7, 
1963 for the new sanctuary and educational space. 
July 4, 1964 Greenway's new sanctuary was dedi- 
cated. April 12, 1964 the baptistry was used the 
first time with 14 baptisms. C. O. Vance served 
until his retirement September 30, 1972 and be- 
cont'd on page 79 



-f- 


1 . ...^iJhI 






W TC 'V. " ' 


1 i 1 i,J 



78 



I 



HOWARD'S CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 





Howard's Creek Baptist Church was constituted 
August 19, 1882 by Elders John Hughes and 
Larkin Hodges with the following members: Mr. 
and Mrs. E. J. Norris, Rev. and Mrs. Edmond 
Greene, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Greene, Mr. and Mrs. 
John Hodges, Fannie Greene, B. E. Greene, W. R. 
Greene, Edward G. Minton, Mr. and Mrs. R. J. 
Minton and Mr. and Mrs. Silas Penley. 

The church has worshipped in three different 
buildings. The first building which was of logs, 
stood near the home of E. J. Norris. The second, 
a wood frame building, was built in 1900. The 
third, a brick building, was built in 1974-75 on 
property purchased by the church adjoining the 
site of the building erected in 1900. The first 
service in the present building was held March 16, 
1975. Rev. James Ray Tester is the present pastor. 




GREENWAY BAPTIST CHURCH cont'd from page 78 
came Pastor Emeritus July 1973. J. C. Jones, Jr. 
became pastor March 1, 1973. November 2, 1975 
groundbreaking was held for a new educational 
building. Greenway Church has ordained Dennis 
Wilson and Dr. Nevin Alwine to preach the gospel. 
Lonnie H. Wymer and Roy M. King have been 
licensed. 




79 



LAUREL SPRINGS BAPTIST CHURCH 




The first efforts towards the organization of 
Laurel Springs Baptist Church were probably 
made by Joseph Brown, the only man in the 
community who was a member of any church. 
The first church was organized in a log building 
about 2 miles west of the present church site. 
The furnishings consisted of split logs for benches 
and other very crude pieces. It was here in Octo- 
ber 1873 that Laurel Springs was constituted. 
There were 15 charter members coming from 
Stony Fork and Three Forks Churches. Michael 
Cook was the first clerk, Joseph Brown and G. D. 
Hendrix the first deacons, William Wilcox the first 
pastor and Billy Moore the first Sunday School 
Superintendent. 

The church derived its name from a clump of 
laurel shrubs which were growing around a spring 
at the rear of the building. 

Soon after the Baptist Church was constituted 
a Methodist Church was organized in the same 
building. Thus this log building became a place 
of worship for both Baptists and Methodists for 
approximately 15 years. 

By 1893 the membership had grown to 155 
and because the log structure was too small and 
not centrally located for the majority of its mem- 



bers a new building was constructed where the 
present one is now located. In 1938 the present 
auditorium was constructed. In 1947 the first 
Sunday School rooms, baptistry and rest rooms 
were planned and by 1950 were completed and 
was free of indebtedness. In 1957 the church saw 
the need of a pastorium so a full time pastor could 
live in the community. This became a reality in 
August 1959. This served the congregation until 
cont'd on page 81 




80 



MABEL BAPTIST CHURCH 




Mabel Baptist Church was organized March 7, 
1948 in the Mabel school house. There were 40 
charter members. The first pastor was Tommy 
Stanbery; the first deacons, R. H. Townsend, C. L. 
Younce, Jim Burkett and Fate Wairen; the first 
clerk, Mrs. Helen Williams; the first treasurer. Fate 
Warren; and the first Sunday School superintend- 
ent, Lewis Burkett. 

There have been 203 members of the church 
and the present membership is 110. Of the 40 
charter members, 12 are still with us. 




LAUREL SPRINGS BAPTIST CHURCH 
cont'd from page 80 

1971. Under the leadership of H. E. Benfield 
additional Sunday School rooms, kitchen facilities 
and parking space was added. The present prop- 
erty is valued at more than $150,000. In June 
1976 the church purchased approximately 2.5 
acres of land for more parking space and recreation 
area for youth activites. 



81 



MEAT CAMP BAPTIST CHURCH 






July 26, 1851 — "We the presby that was re- 
quested to attend on Meat Camp to constitute a 
Baptist Church on second creek attended and ex- 
amined the strength and find the strength suffi- 
cient. We therefore set them apart and give them 
privilege to act as a church open their door for the 
reception of members and all other business of 
church in a gospel way." Thus was the beginning 
of Meat Camp Baptist Church of the Three Forks 
Association. The original members included 6 
from South Fork Church, 11 from Three Forks 
Church and 1 from Ebenezer Church, now Zion- 
ville. Meat Camp resident membership is 185. 

Historical facts about the church include: 
Richard and Benja Green were designated on 
March 4, 1852 to be the first deacons of the 
church with Brother Squire Green added on 
April 4, 1852. The first Footwashing Service was 
held in June 1852. The first church letter was 
granted Brother John Green in October 1852. 
The first disciplinary action was taken in June 

1852 when "Brother came forward and 

stated that he had got out of the way by getting 
out of temper and the second action Brother 

came forward and stated that he had got 

out of the way drinking too much spirits and the 



church thought it proper to look over their in- 
fermities." Dual pastors were elected seven differ- 
ent times, with the first two being Brothers Joseph 
Harrison and Jacob Green. The original meeting 
place was the Academy Building which stood on 
the site of the present buUding. The first church 
building was near Highway No. 194 with the 
present building being returned to the hilltop and 
built in 1927. According to the minutes of July 
1851, the original meeting date was set to be held 
"on the third Saturday in each month". Brother 

cont'd on page 83 




82 



I 



MIDDLE FORK BAPTIST CHURCH 




November 3, 1905 a group of persons met in a 
blacksmith shop and organized Middle Fork 
Baptist Church. There were 18 charter members. 
I. C. Miller was the first pastor and A. J. Shull was 
elected clerk. 

The first church building was dedicated in 1907. 
In recent years it has been enlarged with a full 
size basement to care for the increased attendance. 
There is a fully organized Sunday School, Church 
Training and Woman's Missionary Union. Vacation 
Bible School is held each summer. 

The Rev. George Berry came as pastor in 1976. 



MEAT CAMP BAPTIST CHURCH 
cont'd from page 82 

Benjamin Green was "to take charge of the papers 
till we git a clerk." Meat Camp has had several 
different clerks with the present one having served 
since 1950. Indefinite pastoral call was extended 
in 1955 and full-time service was begun in 1965. 
Thirty-eight men have served as pastors with Rev. 
R. C. Eggers of Zionville, still living, having served 
the longest term — 16 years. At present there are 




8 deacons and 2 honorary deacons. 

In 1956 the cemetery, now supported by Memo- 
ricd Day Offerings, was cleaned and regrassed. 
Buried on the grounds is one former slave, Tony. 
The baptistry was completed in 1974. The first 
contribution to the Association was the sum of 
$1.00 sent in July 1851. In September 1852, 
the first minister was licensed. 



83 



MOUNT CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH 




Mount Calvary Baptist Church was constituted 
in 1789 as Beech Mountain Church. In September 
1886 the name was changed to Mount Calvary. 
Rev. Calvin Harmon was the first pastor. There 
were eight charter members. They were assisted 
in the constitution by Rev. J. W. Hall and Rev. 
D. C. Harmon, Elders of the Regular Baptist 
Church of Jesus Christ. 

An old log school house, one mile from the vil- 
lage of Banner Elk, was used as a meeting house 
until a small frame house was built. This house 
served as a church and school building. 

In 1898 the familiar white steepled church was 



built and served until 1932 when the present 
church was erected. An educational addition was 
completed in 1966. In 1973 the pastorium was 
converted into an educational facility and a mod- 
ern pastorium was completed. 

Ministers ordained are Sidney King, J. J. McGin- 
nis, Roby Painter, Ira Hodges. These churches 
came out of Mount Calvary: Elk Valley, White 
Rock and Valley Haven. Bethany was given finan- 
cial help when constituted. 

Mount Calvary has been a member of the Three 
Forks Association since its beginning. 

Rev. Dean Baughn is the present pastor. 



From Minutes of Three Forks Baptist Association 

POPLAR GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 
August 29, 1951 



By motion duly made and passed the Clerk is directed 
to prepare the manuscript for the minutes, have 1000 
printed and distributed to the churches and for this 
work he is to receive $40.00. 



84 



MOUNT CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH 




From Minutes of Three Forks Baptist Association 

MOUNT CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH 
August 26, 1942 
Report Of Associational Missionary 

During the past year I have visited thirty churches 
and have also visited more than 700 homes. In doing 
this I have traveled ten thousand miles. I have con- 
ducted six revivals which resulted in forty-three con- 
versions and thirty-eight additions to the churches. 
I have constituted two new churches: Mountain Dale 
and Tabernacle. The following amounts have been 
received for my work : 



Missionary Work $67.00 

Revival Work $100.00 

Pastoral Work $157.00 

Total $324.00 



Of this amount I have given back to the work in build- 
ing new churches $150.00. 

N. M. Greene 



85 



MOUNT LEBANON BAPTIST CHURCH 




Mount Lebanon Baptist Church was constituted 
May 30, 1891 in the Bryan School House with 15 
charter members. The name of the new church 
was suggested by J. D. Bryan. On May 31, 1891 
the first pastor and officers were elected as follows: 
D. C. Harmon, pastor; J. D. Bryan, clerk; and G. W. 
McGinnis and J. D. Bryan, deacons. 

The church worshipped in the Bryan School 
House for several years. About 1900 Alfred Hatley 
gave the land on which to erect a building but it 
was some years before the building was completed. 
From then until 1970, several improvements were 
made and additions built onto the original building. 

March 16, 1970 the church met in special con- 
ference and decided to erect a new building in the 
near future. The church bought additional land, 
a building committee and a decorating committee 
were elected and authority given to dispose of the 
old building as soon as services were moved into 
the new building. June 17, 1973 the first worship 
service was held in the new building. 

The total cost of the building and land was 
$115,411.10. With God's help and through tithes, 



offerings and contributions this was paid for in 
seventeen months. 

Twenty-two men have served the church as 
pastor, seven of whom are still living. 

Rev. Carl Wilson, the present pastor, was elected 
June 22, 1968 and we thank God for his faithful 
guidance through the years. 




86 



MOUNTAIN DALE BAPTIST CHURCH 




When the Three Forks Baptist Association met 
on August 25, 1942 at Mount Calvary Baptist 



Church, Mountain Dale Baptist Church applied 
for membership in the Association and was ac- 
cepted. This church was organized under the 
leadership of Rev. N. M. Greene, associational 
missionary. Rev. Ronda Earp was the first pastor. 
The first year there were 31 persons received as 
members by letter and 9 by baptism. There were 
81 enrolled in Sunday School and an average at- 
tendance of 75. Rev. Carl Wilson is the present 
pastor. 




87 



OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 





Oak Grove Baptist Church traces its beginning 
to the estabhshment of a Sunday School in the 
Oak Grove School building in 1912. Worship serv- 
ices were held in connection with the Sunday 
School, the preaching being done by the pastors 
from Brushy Fork, Poplar Grove and Three Forks 
Churches. Rev. L. A. Wilson led in the first revival 
and a large number were baptized. 

In a few years the attendance and interest had 
grown until a church was constituted on March 17, 
1916 and named after the school and community- 
Oak Grove. Elders I. J. McGinnis and E. M. Gragg 
led in the organization. The cheirter members 
were: Mr. and Mrs. B. A. Foster, Grace Foster, 
Sue Greene, E. C. Hodges, Mr. and Mrs. Letcher 
Barnes, Stewart Barnes, Polly Adams, Mr. and Mrs. 
W. M. Hodges, Mr. and Mrs. John Hodges, Mr. and 
Mrs. J. G. Hodges and Mrs. P. C. Wyke. Rev. E. M. 
Gragg was elected pastor. 

The membership of the church has shown a 
steady growth from the original 17 members in 
1916 to 402 in 1976. 

A total of 11 pastors have served Oak Grove in 
its 60 year history. These are: E. M. Gragg 1916- 



17; W. A. PenneU 1917-19; E. C. Hodges 1920-23; 
F. C. Watts 1924-27; W. D. Ashley 1928-30; F. C. 
Watts 1931-38; G. A. Hamby 1939-46; C. O. Vance 
1947-56; W. Walter Jones 1957-63; E. S. Morgan 
1963-67; Fritz D. Hemphill 1967-71; Fred W. 
Reece 1972-Now. 

Ordained as ministers by Oak Grove Church are: 
E. C. Hodges March 16, 1918; Howard Hodges 
August 25, 1954; and Howard Barnes October 24, 
1954. 




88 



PERKINSVILLE BAPTIST CHURCH 




The Perkinsville Baptist Church was organized 
in an old store building in the Perkinsville com- 
munity June 29, 1947. Baptist ministers present 
for the organization were Nathan M. Greene, R. C. 
Eggers and W. D. Ashley. There were sixteen who 
brought letters of transfer from other churches to 
constitute the new church; six others presented 
themselves for membership upon profession of 
faith and ten came under the watchcare of the 
church pending the arrival of their church letters. 

July 13, 1947, at the first church conference, 
Rev. Nathan M. Greene was elected the first pastor, 
Woodrow Greene, clerk and Hoye Greene, treas- 
urer. N. L. Barnes and Judd Barnes were elected 
the first deacons. At the second monthly confer- 
ence, August 10, 1947, the church voted to join 
the Three Forks Baptist Association. The congre- 
gation met in the old store building until a new 
church building was completed in early 1950. 

A passenger bus was purchased in 1951 to en- 
able the church to reach people who had no means 
of transportation. In 1952 the church voted to 
finish the front of the church. In 1953 lots were 
purchased adjacent to the church property and a 



parsonage was constructed. During 1962 and 1963 
an educational building was erected, parking lots 
paved and a stone wall built around the back of the 
church. In 1964, 1975 and 1976 additional prop- 
erty was purchased. 

A church kindergarten was established in 1966, 
a teacher and a part-time youth director employed. 

In 1973 the church voted to sell the parsonage 
and give the pastor a housing allowance. Plans are 
now being made for a new sanctuary and renova- 
tion of the old sanctuary. The total church mem- 
bership is 407 with an annual budget of $62,748. 




89 



PLEASANT GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 




Pleasant Grove Baptist Church was constituted 
June 14, 1891 by a presbytery composed of A. J. 
McBride, J. J. L. Sherwood and David Greene, 
with 26 charter members from Cove Creek and 
Zionville Baptist Churches. David Greene was 
elected pastor and Rufus Smith and James Isaacs, 
the first deacons. The church was admitted into 
the Three Forks Baptist Association when it met 
at Mount Gilead Church in 1891. 

There have been 18 different pastors with the 
present pastor, Herbert McCoy, serving twice. 
B. R. Tuttle was the first full-time pastor, coming 
to the church in 1959. 

The parsonage was built in 1941 and a new brick 
church building in 1962. 

The Church has ordained to the Gospel Ministry 



John Hagaman in 1946; Robert White, 1972; 
James Ray (Pete) Tester, 1973; Harold Danner, 
1975 and James Hagaman, son of John Hagaman, 
January 5, 1975. 





90 



POPLAR GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 





Poplar Grove Baptist Church was constituted in 
the summer of 1872. The cheirter members came 
from Three Forks and Mount Vernon Baptist 
churches. The congregation met in a log building 
for eight years. Then a new frame building was 
constructed on the present site. The congregation 
grew until it was necess£iry to build a leirger church. 
While the smeill church was being torn away and 
the present one was being constructed, services 
were held in the school house on the church lot. 
This took place in 1914. Sunday School rooms 
were later added with many improvements being 
made on the building and grounds since. More 
than 15 preachers have served the congregation 
since 1872. Poplar Grove was a member of the 
Stony Fork Association until 1932 when it joined 
the Three Forks Association. The Three Forks 



Association has met with the Poplar Grove Church 
twice, in 1951 and 1958. The present membership 
is 139. Rev. Donald Critcher is the present pastor. 





91 



PROFFIT'S GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 



Proffit's Grove Baptist Church was organized in 
1911. Approximately 30 members from the 
mother church, Meat Camp Baptist Church, 
formed their church on land donated by Chap 
Proffit. Rev. L. A. Wilson was their first pastor. 
Land was later donated by Willie Proffit for a 
cemetery . 

In 1948 one Sunday School room was added to 
each side of the church. Four Sunday School 
rooms and a kitchen were added in 1967. The 
work was completed on our Pastor's study in 
July of this year. 




92 



RICH MOUNTAIN BAPTIST CHURCH 






The Rich Mountain Baptist Church was estab- 
lished in 1905. The first membership was about 
thirty who came from Doe Ridge and Pleasant 
Grove Baptist Churches. The first pastor was Rev. 
Leonard C. Wilson. 

After about four years of meeting in the old 
elementary school building, the congregation 
moved into the first church building. Meetings 
were held regularly in this building until Sunday 
April 11, 1976, when the congregation entered 
the new church building under the present pas- 
tor. Rev. James D. Hagaman. 

We are very proud of the new church building 
with which we have been blessed, and are eagerly 
anticipating future growth of our church in the 
Lord. 




93 



RUTHERWOOD BAPTIST CHURCH 




The need for a church in the Rutherwood com- 
munity had been felt by several people for a num- 
ber of years. Those interested had organized a 
Sunday School which met in the school house. 

In October 1938 W. J. Cook, at the request of 
the people in the community, held a revival meet- 
ing. The new converts did not wish to join a 
church outside their community and several mem- 
bers of other churches who lived in the community 
agreed that a new church should be organized. The 
new converts joined Mount Vernon Church and 
then procured their letters in a group. These with 
others from Three Forks and Laurel Springs— 28— 
met in the school house and organized Ruther- 
wood Baptist Church November 17, 1938. W. J. 
Cook was elected pastor and Mrs. Addie Clawson, 
clerk. 

In January 1939 W. J. Carroll and Spencer 
Brovm were ordained deacons to serve with D. C. 
Michael, an ordained deacon from Meat Camp. 
During this first winter services were held in the 
school house. A site for a church building was giv- 



en by EUer McNeil and John W. Hodges and the 
building was erected in 1939. At the 1939 Session 
of the Three Forks Baptist Association, Ruther- 
wood Church was admitted to membership. 

Rutherwood Church has one of the most mod- 
em plants in our Association with ample room for 
all activities of the church. 




94 



SHULLS MILLS BAPTIST CHURCH 




Shulls Mills Baptist Church was established in 
1888. It grew slowly until the early 1900's when 
the community of Shulls Mills began to grow rap- 
idly. In the 1920's industry came to Shulls Mills. 
Boone Lumber Company was established. People 
CEime from miles around to the church. Most of 
them walked, some for miles. Then as the industry 
began to fade away, people began to move away 



where work could be found. Membership, in the 
church however, remained between 80-100. In 
the 1950's and 1960's the membership began to 
fall. In the 1950's the new church was built. Over 
the last few years membership remained in the 
50's. We are a small church in number, but our 
love for our Lord Jesus Christ and our love for our 
fellow brothers and sisters is as big as the largest 
church. 



From Minutes of Three Forks Baptist Association 



LAUREL SPRINGS BAPTIST CHURCH 
August 28-30, 1900 



We are happy to say that the Sunday School work 
is on the increase. There is a good work being done 
and yet there remains a great deal to be done. 

We do not believe there is any work, save the preach- 
ing of the Gospel, that is of such vital importance to the 
prosperity of the churches as the Sunday School. Its 
influence for good has been felt and realized all over 
the land. This body would therefore, insist upon the 



different churches to put forth stronger efforts to enlist 
the Sunday School. (At this time there were 26 
churches in the Association, all of which had a Sunday 
School. But some remained open only during the 
months when the weather was agreeable. They 
would close during the winter months and reorganize 
in the spring.— B. P.) 

George Roten, G. W. McGuire, committee 



95 



SOUTH FORK BAPTIST CHURCH 



South Fork Baptist Church was constituted in 
1833, but services were held prior to this and was 
known as Shiloh Meeting House. The land upon 
which the church was built was given by Joseph 
and Thomas Brown in 1832. The first building 
was a log building with split logs for seats. In the 
late 1800's the second church building was con- 
structed. 

When the church was constituted in 1833 there 
were eight charter members. Later the same year 
about 35 members were added by experience and 
12 by letter. The first clerk was Nathaniel Church. 
Richard Jacks, William B. Swanson and J. W. 
McBryde all seem to have been preaching in the 
church and acting as moderator but no record is 



found that they were either elected or appointed as 
pastor. In 1838 the church sent two members to 
Old Fields Church to petition them for part of 
Isaiah Wilcoxen's time. The request was granted 
and he served as pastor. In 1890 Lewis Seatz 
agreed to be the church sexton, or janitor, and 
serve the church one year for $1.00. 

During the pastorate of Rev. Raymond Hendrix 
the present church was constructed. The first 
services were held in the new building in early 
1950. Since then additions have been made to the 
building, a baptistry installed and new furniture 
added. A parsonage was built and first used in 
1965. 

Rev. R. D. Byrd is the present pastor. 



BLOWING ROCK BAPTIST CHURCH 

May 5, 1944 
Baptist Contribution To Christianity 



Mr. Canipe especially emphasized the following 
beliefs of Baptists: (1) Regenerated church membership. 
(2) The New Testament is the only rule of faith and 
practice. (3) Immersion is the only baptism. (4) Inde- 
pendence of the local congregation. (5) Separation 



of Church and State. (6) Democracy in the Church 
government. (7) Belief in cooperation of the local 
Baptist church with other Baptist churches and other 
denominations. 



96 



SOUTH FORK BAPTIST CHURCH 




From Minutes of Three Forks Baptist Association 

SOUTH FORK BAPTIST CHURCH 
August 29-30, 1933 
Report On Woman's Missionary Union 

At the close of the twentieth year of the Woman's 
Missionary Union in Three Forks Association, we make 
our report with very humble hearts, realizing that we 
have not done all we should have. 

Owing to the depression and the greater demands 
at home our contributions to missions and benevolences 
have fallen off, yet when we take into consideration 
ther personal service work done by the societies we 
are made to feel that we have accomplished something 
during the past year. 

Our Annual Meeting was held in Boone Baptist 
Church. A large delegation was present and every 
woman went back home resolved to "Launch Out" 
in the Master's cause. 

We now have 13 young people's organizations and 
11 W. M. U's, 5 new organizations in the past year. 
We contirbuted to missions last year $553.78. Your 
committee recommends that the pastors especially 
use their influence and try to lead the women of their 
churches to organize themselves into Woman's Missio- 
nary Societies. We urge our pastors and laymen to 
attend the Quarterly and Annual Meetings of the Wo- 
man's Missionary Union. 

Mrs. Hattie S.Johnson, Mrs. D. P. Coffey, committee 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST CHURCH 
August 27-29, 1940 

J. C. Canipe offered the following resolution which 
was unanimously adopted. Resolved, that the Three 
Forks Association in its 100th session at the Three 
Forks Church, August 27, 1940, go on record for the 
following: (1) That we call upon the members of the 
next Legislature to give us a referendum on the question 
of liquor and beer in the state of North Carolina. (2) 
That we call on our officers of the law in North Carolina 
to enforce the law against slot machines and all gambling 
devices. And that we pledge them our support in such 
enforcement. (3) That we as individuals and as churches 
will do our part against the above named evils. (4) 
That we will make an honest effort to carry the gospel 
of Christ to those who are engaged in this nefarious 
business. 

Thursday evening August 29, 1940 a historical pag- 
eant celebrating the One Hundred and Fiftieth Anniver- 
sary of Three Forks Chruch and the Centennial of the 
Three Forks Association was given at Boone Baptist 
Chruch at 8:00 p.m. (The pageant depicted the beginn- 
ing of religious work of the Baptist Denomination in 
the territory that is now Watauga County from the days 
of the Indians to the present. The pageant was based 
upon historical facts as shown by minutes and records 
available. The names of the characters in the pageant 
were the actual people who took part in the organizat- 
ion of the Church and Association.) It was written by 
J. C. Canipe and was directed by A. Antonakos of the 
Appalachian State Teachers College, Boone, N. C. 



97 



STONY FORK BAPTIST CHURCH 




Stony Fork Baptist Church was constituted 
November 19, 1841, with 39 members from Lewis 
Fork, Old Fields and Three Forks Churches. The 
first pastor was Elder William Church. Thirty-one 
pastors have served the church through the years. 
The present pastor is Rex Foster. 

Stony Fork has ordained the following minis- 
ters to preach the gospel: Finley Carlton, Solomon 
Greene, Jr., Isaac Miller, Henry Smith, Macon 
Greene, Homer Greene, Sherill Wellborn and Ray- 
tee Greene. 

Stony Fork joined Lewis Fork Association in 
1842 and when Stony Fork Association was or- 
ganized it was a member. It joined Three Forks 
Association in 1911 of which it is still a member. 

Stony Fork Church was constituted in a log 
building about one mile down Stony Fork Creek 
from where the present building stands. In May 
1866 the church agreed to build a new meeting 
house. The old building was sold for $5.00 and a 
new log building erected which was used for a 
school house also. 



The present building is of masonry and frame 
construction with brick veneer providing ample 
space for worship, Sunday School and other phases 
of church work. It was dedicated in 1941. 




98 



TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH 




A revival meeting conducted by N. M. Greene, 
assisted by J. C. Canipe and Ronda Earp, began 
at Miller Schoolhouse Sunday October 12, 1941. 
The meeting continued for two weeks with serv- 
ices each night. Five conversions were reported. 
During this meeting a movement arose to establish 
a Baptist Church in the community. 

A Sunday School was organized October 26, 
1941 with the election of Mrs. K. W. Brown, 
Superintendent, and a prayer meeting begun. 

Because of the interest of a number of citizens 
in the community it was thought advisable to pur- 
chase the Miller Schoolhouse from the Watauga 
County Board of Education. After considerable 
discussion this purchase was made for $775.00, 
and later a part of the first was sold for $125.00. 

In the autumn of 1964 construction of a new 
building adjacent to the old building was begun. 
The new building was occupied in 1965 and was 
formally dedicated September 1, 1968. Later 
improvements included carpeting of the sanctuary, 
installation of suspended ceiling in the basement 
Sunday School rooms and the recreation room, 
and the purchase of a new piano. 

A valuable addition to the church grounds was 
donated by Mrs. Julia Phillips in 1971. A deed to 



the Norris Cemetery plus additional space was 
granted the church in 1975 by Milton Moretz and 
is now named the Norris Tabernacle Cemetery. 

Charter members were: N. M. Greene, Wade 
Byers, Lloyd Stanbery, Litha Norris, Roxie Brown, 
K. W. Brown, Fred Brown, Juha Phillips, Mrs. Tom 
Jackson, Vanna Stanbery, Glenn Stanbery, B. H. 
Phillips and Cecil Moretz. 

Pastors have been: N. M. Greene, Arlie Moretz, 
W. J. Cook, Lloyd Cullers, Roby Painter, Raymond 
Hendrix, Wendel Critcher, Glenn South, Archie 
Clawson, Lewis Hodges and the present pastor, 
Raymond Hendrix. 




99 



THREE FORKS BAPTIST CHURCH 




The history of the Three Forks Baptist Church 
began when North Carohna Baptists migrated to an 
isolated mountain region beyond the Blue Ridge. 
In that westward movement many Baptist pioneers 
came to what is present day Watauga County. 
Some of these pioneers found a new home in the 
New River section while others moved westward 
into Tennessee and Kentucky. 

The Three Forks Baptist Church, established 
November 6, in 1790, was a result of the migration 
of Baptists to the New River section of Wilkes 
County, now a part of Watauga County. 

The Three Forks Church was instrumental in 
establishing many new churches and it eventually 
became the mother of an entire association of 
churches in the New River section. 

The church set up rigid standards of conduct 
for its members and expected them to live up to 
the standards. Church discipline was the one mor- 
al force that exerted a powerful influence on the 
Baptist people in the Three Forks Church and 
other Baptist churches in the area. 

The building program of the church evolved 
according to membership and needs. The first 
building for Three Forks was reportedly a rude 
cont'd on page 101 




100 



TIMBERED RIDGE BAPTIST CHURCH 





Timbered Ridge Baptist Church was organized 
February 16, 1906, at Timbered Ridge School 
House with 32 charter members coming from 
Bethel, Antioch and Mount Gilead of the Three 
Forks Association. Two members came from 
Mountain View and one from Sugar Grove Church 
of the Watauga Baptist Association of Tennessee. 

Rev. John F. EUer was chosen as the first pastor. 
A Sunday School was organized at the same time 
and has been active ever since. 

The Three Forks Association met with the Tim- 
bered Ridge Church in its Annual Session in 1922. 

May 1, 1942 the Spring Session of the Associa- 
tion met with the church. At this meeting the 
church was dedicated. N. M. Greene, pastor, led 
in the dedication service. 




THREE FORKS cont'd from page 100 

log cabin without chimney or windows; one or 
two subsequent log buildings were probably 
used, one definitely being built in the early 1800's. 
The frame structure shown in the picture was built 
in 1866. It was located on the New River, east of 
Boone, about one-fourth mile from the present 
bridge on U.S. Highway 421 that crosses the South 
Fork of New River. A monument marks the orig- 



inal site. A graveyard of Civil War and Revolution- 
ary War members of the church is nearby. The 
church moved and rebuilt in 1923 on Highway 421 
just west of South Fork New River Bridge. The 
church built the present structure in 1948 and 
added a wing in 1975. Recently the church re- 
modeled the main structure through-out. 

Three Forks has its first minutes preserved in 
their original copies. 



101 



UNION BAPTIST CHURCH 



Union Baptist Church was organized August 1, 
1885 at North Fork, Mabel, N. C. There were 
twelve members who came from Zionville and 
organized the church. John Hughes was the first 
pastor. 

The church has grown from the 12 charter 
members to 284 at the last report. 

August 1, 1939 a building program was started. 
The old building was torn down and the site ex- 
cavated and a new building erected with a large 
auditorium and 6 Sunday School rooms. Improve- 
ments have been made through the years and the 
present building is the result. 

This church joined the Three Forks Association 
in 1902. 

Rev. W. A. Greer is the present pastor. 



WHITE ROCK BAPTIST CHURCH 





White Rock Baptist Church was organized 
August 26, 1945. The presbytery was made up 
of the following: Rev. Ira Hodges, Rev. R. C. 
Eggers, Rev. G. A. Hamby, A. L. Watson, M. P. 
Ward and Homer Shomaker. R. C. Eggers was 
appointed moderator. After being questioned on 
their Biblical beliefs, the group was given the 
right to become a church. G. A. Hamby was elec- 
ted pastor and Mrs. Ruth Shook clerk and treasurer. 
A large rock cliff, called the White Rocks, gave 
inspiration to the name White Rock Baptist Church. 
There were 16 charter members: J. D. Shook, Mae 
Shook, James Ruppard, Audrey Shook, Rhonda 
Shook, Earl Ruppard, Willie Ruppard, Rosa Van- 



noy, L. D. Ruppard, Bynum Shook, Blaine Byers, 
Ruth Shook, Velva Vannoy, Mildred Shook, Nora 
Ruppard, and Pauline Shook. 

October 28, 1945, L. D. Ruppard, J. D. Shook 
and Rommie Ruppard were ordained the first dea- 
cons. Dayton Jones was elected pastor in 1947. 
Other pastors have been Ned Hughes, Hade Smith, 
Wendell Critcher, and Orville Wallace who is cur- 
rently serving the church. 

The original building has been destroyed and the 
present building was recently remodeled. Member- 
ship has grown from the original 16 to the present 
96. 

The land for the church and cemetery was a gift 
from Brother Hoyle H. Shook. 



ZIONVILLE BAPTIST CHURCH 
August 25-26, 1936 
Report On Temperance 



Your Committee on Temperance submits the fol- 
lowing report: (1) That the beauty of temperance be 
stressed in all our religious activities. (2) That the 
officers of the law are not expected to do the work of 
church members. (3) That we do not sleep on our jobs. 
(4) That we give assistance instead of criticism to the 



officers of the law. (5) That as citizens we keep public 
opinion healthy by sermons, addresses, programs and 
the press. (6) That the work being done by the United 
Dry Forces in our schools be commended. 

W. F. Sherwood, A. I. Greene, Committee 



103 



VANDERPOOL BAPTIST CHURCH 



/: 




Vanderpool Baptist Mission, a mission of Cove 
Creek Baptist Church, met August 16, 1953 for the 
purpose of constituting a Missionary Baptist 
Church. R. C. Eggers was moderator. There were 
20 charter members — 11 from Cove Creek and 9 
from Willowdale. By unanimous vote, the name of 
Vanderpool Baptist Church, was adopted. 

Rev. Gene Sherwood was elected the first pas- 
tor; Ted Eller, Sunday School Superintendent; Mrs. 
Maye Eggers, Training Union Director; Mrs. Eunice 
Eller, W. M. U. President; Jay Isaacs, treasurer; and 
Dexter Eggers, clerk. 




104 




WILLOWDALE BAPTIST CHURCH 




Willowdale Baptist Church was constituted 
February 25, 1911 with 29 charter members from 
Cove Creek and Brushy Fork Churches. Since all 
the first church records were lost in a fire, not 
much is known of the early years. S. L. Fox was 
the first pastor and B. S. Dugger the first clerk. 

A Sunday School was organized at the time the 
church was constituted and has always been active. 
Today there is also an active Church Training pro- 
gram and a Woman's Missionary Union. 




Willowdale Church has ordained Delmar James. 

The present officers of the church are: Cannon 
G. Ward, pastor; Steve Ward, Sunday School Direc- 
tor; Miss Corrine Greer, Church Training Director; 
Mrs. Faye Farmer, W. M. U. Director; Mrs. Pauline 
Hicks, clerk and James A. Dugger, treasurer. 

The present building was constructed about 
1960 and has adequate facilities for the member- 
ship. 




105 



WILLOW VALLEY BAPTIST CHURCH 




Willow Valley Baptist Church was organized added to and improved since. The present mem- 
February 9, 1935, with 31 charter members. bership is 151. Rev. A. Ray Minton is the present 
The first pastor was W. J. Cook. The two first pastor. 



deacons, J. O. Ward and Dillard Greene were or- 
dained at Antioch Baptist Church. Soon after 
Willow Valley was organized G. C. Ward, J. R. 
Phillips, and L. D. Harman were ordained deacons. 
The first clerk was D. W. Edmisten. 

Willow Valley has ordained three men to the 
Gospel Ministry: D. W. Edmisten, Raynor Mathe- 
son and Roby Greene. 

The church has had an active Sunday School and 
prayer meeting since its organization and now has 
an active Woman's Missionary Union. 

In the 1940's a new building was erected near 
where the old one stood. This building has been 




106 



ZION HILL BAPTIST CHURCH 




Zion Hill Baptist Church was organized in 1886 
by D. C. Harmon and Jacob Younce with 26 mem- 
bers. The first pastor was A. J. Harmon, the first 
clerk D. W. Hagaman and the first deacons Eli 
Harmon, E. T. Presnell and D. W. Hagaman. 

The first sermon was preached by Reuben Farth- 
ing in 1885 before the building was completed on 
the subject, "Job and His Patience". 

Elder A. J. Harmon donated the site and was the 
moving spirit in the buUding and organization of 
the church and was a tower of strength until his 
death. Many others worked tirelessly to erect and 
maintain the church. The new church building was 
completed in 1948. In 1975 the building was 
bricked, Sunday School rooms added in the base- 
ment and in 1976 a steeple installed. 

The church ordained the following to the minis- 
try: John Keller, L. H. Hagaman, Tommy Stan- 
bery, Kermit Combs and Kermon Hagaman. 



The present deacons of the church are: Stacy 
Moody, Ronald Ward, Dwight Brown, Raymond 
Brown and Luther Harmon. Rev. Quincy Norris 
is the pastor. 




107 



ZIONVILLE BAPTIST CHURCH 






Zionville Baptist Church was constituted Aug- 
ust 13, 1836 by Isaiah Wilcoxen and Barzilla 
McBride. The first church building was of logs, 
stood in the middle of the present cemetery and 
was called Ebenezer. In 1872 the name was 
changed to Mount Zion and was later changed to 
Zionville. The second building was a large frame 
building that would seat 500 people and stood 
where the present church building stands. This 
building was taken down in 1929 and the present 
one built. 

Zionville Baptist Church began with 14 members 
from the Cove Creek Baptist Church. In the 
1890's a Brother Hicks helped the pastor, E. F. 
Jones, in a revival and 60 people were saved and 
baptized. 



Zionville Church loves the Three Forks Baptist 
Association and has been a member since 1836. 




108 



I 



i